Clementine Curd

Clementine Curd
Clementine Curd

Christmas is an excellent time to make clementine curd when fresh clementines are readily available.  While certainly lesser known than the traditional lemon curd, clementine curd is lovely in its own way.

Less sharp and “puckery” than lemon curd, clementine curd is almost identical in color to lemon curd (perhaps a slight bit paler) and still has a lovely citrus flavour.

Clementine Curd
Clementine Curd

Be prepared to devote some time and patience to making any curd.  It cooks slowly over a pot of simmering (never boiling) water to reach its finished stage (170F on a candy thermometer). You may wish to read my previous postings on making lemon curd and rhubarb curd for hints and tips on make curd as the same techniques apply to the making of clementine curd.

Clementine Curd
Clementine Curd

Use this clementine curd in the same way in which you would use lemon curd — as a spread on biscuits, scones, muffins, or toast; as a filling for cakes; in a parfait with Greek yogurt; or as a filling for tarts and cookies. Bottle the curd in a fancy jar and you have a lovely gift for someone, especially if you include a batch of homemade scones or biscuits with it.

Clementine Curd
Clementine Curd

[Printable recipe follows at end of posting]

Clementine Curd

Ingredients:

¾ cup caster* sugar or granulated sugar
2½ tsp clementine zest
7 tbsp freshly squeezed clementine juice, strained (apx. 5 clementines, depending on size)
2 extra-large egg yolks
1 large whole egg
3 tbsp unsalted butter at room temperature

Method:

In bottom of double boiler, bring about 2” of water to the simmer point (around 200°F). Maintain the water at this simmer point over medium-low heat.  Place sugar in top of double boiler or heat-proof bowl.  Mix in the clementine zest.  Whisk the clementine juice into sugar.
In small bowl, lightly beat the 2 egg yolks and the whole egg together with a fork, just enough to break up the yolks and blend with the whole egg.  Whisk the eggs into the sugar-clementine juice mixture. Add the soft butter.  Place this pot or bowl over the simmering water. Stir the mixture continuously as it cooks until it is thickened and the temperature of the mixture registers 170°F on a candy thermometer.  Be patient as this will take awhile. Make sure the water in the bottom of the boiler does not boil and stays only at the simmer point.
Remove curd from heat and strain through a mesh strainer to remove any of the egg white that may have coagulated as well as the clementine rind.  Pour strained curd into a sterilized bottle.  Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the curd to prevent it from forming a skin on top. Cool at room temperature. Remove plastic wrap. Cover jar tightly and refrigerate for up to 1 week.

Yield: Apx. 1 cup

*caster sugar may also be known as fruit sugar, berry sugar, super fine sugar, or instant dissolving sugar.

Note:  Altitude may affect the temperature at which the water reaches the simmering point. The important thing is that the water in the bottom of the double boiler does not boil or touch the top of the double boiler/heatproof bowl during the cooking of the curd.

Print

Clementine Curd

Similar to lemon curd but more mellow, this delightful clementine curd is especially love at Christmas when fresh clementines are readily available.
Course Dessert
Author My Island Bistro Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup caster sugar or granulated sugar
  • 2 1/2 tsp clementine zest
  • 7 tbsp freshly squeezed clementine juice, strained (apx. 5 clementines, depending on size)
  • 2 extra-large egg yolks
  • 1 large whole egg
  • 3 tbsp unsalted butter at room temperature

Instructions

  1. In bottom of double boiler, bring about 2” of water to the simmer point (around 200°F). Maintain the water at this simmer point over medium-low heat. Place sugar in top of double boiler or heat-proof bowl. Mix in the clementine zest. Whisk the clementine juice into sugar.
  2. In small bowl, lightly beat the 2 egg yolks and the whole egg together with a fork, just enough to break up the yolks and blend with the whole egg. Whisk the eggs into the sugar-clementine juice mixture. Add the soft butter. Place this pot or bowl over the simmering water. Stir the mixture continuously as it cooks until it is thickened and the temperature of the mixture registers 170°F on a candy thermometer. Be patient as this will take awhile. Make sure the water in the bottom of the boiler does not boil and stays only at the simmer point.
  3. Remove curd from heat and strain through a mesh strainer to remove any of the egg white that may have coagulated as well as the clementine rind. Pour strained curd into a sterilized bottle. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the curd to prevent it from forming a skin on top. Cool at room temperature. Remove plastic wrap. Cover jar tightly and refrigerate for up to 1 week. Yield: Apx. 1 cup

Recipe Notes

*caster sugar may also be known as fruit sugar, berry sugar, super fine sugar, or instant dissolving sugar.

Note:  Altitude may affect the temperature at which the water reaches the simmering point. The important thing is that the water in the bottom of the double boiler does not boil or touch the top of the double boiler/heatproof bowl during the cooking of the curd.

 

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Clementine Curd
Clementine Curd

 

Clementine Curd
Clementine Curd

 

Clementine Curd
Clementine Curd