Tag Archives: chowder

Creamy Homestyle Corn Chowder Recipe

Small casserole filled with golden corn chowder accompanied by homemade rolls
Corn Chowder

Late summer brings some wonderful flavors and that includes corn. After a few “feeds” of corn-on-the-cob, I am ready to have the veggie served in other ways, like in this Creamy Homestyle Corn Chowder. Pure comfort food at its finest and nothing compares to the homemade version!

Corn Chowder is not difficult to make though there are steps involved and it does take a bit of time but, oh, the flavor is incomparable!

While corn chowder can be made with frozen corn kernels, the chowder really is at its ultimate when made with kernels stripped from freshly picked corn and the cobs then used to add wonderful flavor to the poultry stock base. Use your favorite variety of corn – peaches and cream or sweet yellow corn work well, for example. The chowder in the photos that accompany this posting was made with peaches and cream corn and the beautiful golden yellow color is all natural.

Casserole filled with golden corn chowder
Creamy Homestyle Corn Chowder

Once the kernels are stripped from the cobs with a sharp knife, the cobs are added to the poultry stock in a stockpot. There is a lot of flavor to be had from those cobs! I like to use my own homemade turkey or chicken stock as the base though bought stock may also be used. Letting the stripped cobs simmer away in the stock will really add more corn flavor to the chowder.

Chowders are all about layering in flavor. My recipe does not call for a large quantity of any one spice. Rather, the chowder is gently flavored with select spices, none of which detract from the pure corn flavor.

I save the rinds from parmesan cheese and keep them in the freezer. When I am making certain chowders, like this Corn Chowder, for example, in which I am going to be adding parmesan cheese as an ingredient, I will add a 2½” – 3” piece of rind to the stock as it cooks because it does impart wonderful flavor. The chowder stock can be made without the cheese rind but, if you have one, toss it in the pot.

Bowl of corn chowder with two homemade rolls
Creamy Homestyle Corn Chowder

The usual cast of characters are used for the aromatics — onion, celery, carrot, sweet pepper, and garlic – and, when sautéed in some bacon fat and butter, they certainly add to the flavor base. The crisply fried bacon from which the fat has been rendered is a great garnish for the chowder. Some recipes call for the bacon to be incorporated into the chowder and that can certainly be done. I, however, prefer to simply add it as a garnish.

Adding diced potato to corn chowder is a perfect way to add bulk and chunkiness to the texture but be sure to use potatoes that will hold their shape when cooked and not become mushy. I tend to lean toward Yukon Gold or Red Norlands for chowders though other varieties may work well, too. Just cook the potatoes, along with the corn kernels, in the stock mixture until the potatoes are barely fork tender.

I use cornstarch (versus flour) as the thickening agent for the Corn Chowder because cornstarch is gluten free for those who, for various reasons, cannot tolerate gluten, and also because I find it makes a lovely smooth textured chowder and there is no starchy or pasty taste that can sometimes happen when flour is used as the thickener.

A good portion of the cooked mixture is puréed in a blender until it is silky smooth and then is poured back into the stockpot with the remaining vegetable and stock mixture. This gives the chowder the velvety smooth textured base but, by leaving some of the mixture in its chunky state, it provides that homestyle, hearty texture.

Bowl filled with Corn Chowder
Creamy Homestyle Corn Chowder

A wee bit of sweetness to complement the corn is obtained by adding just a small amount of maple syrup.

I do not recommend fat-reduced dairy products for chowders. No…..just don’t do it as they tend to make a thinner, more watery base. A good chowder should be rich and creamy and that can really only be obtained by using the good stuff — yes, cream!

Now, there are various degrees of cream – I find I get a great corn chowder from using 10% blend cream mixed with some sour cream which has a bit of tang to it. Higher percentage creams, up to and including whipping cream, also work in the chowder so, go crazy with the cream if you wish! Add some shredded cheddar cheese and grated parmesan cheese for an even richer flavored chowder – oh-là-là! All that’s needed for a satisfying meal would be homemade rolls. Either my pan rolls or dinner rolls are ideal with this chowder.

The wonderful thing about corn (apart from its lovely flavor) is that it is a vegetable that enjoys a relatively long season from August well into the fall. So, don’t miss out on the opportunity to make a delicious Corn Chowder from the fresh corn when it is available locally.

Spoonful of creamy corn chowder
Corn Chowder

[Printable recipe follows at end of posting]

Creamy Homestyle Corn Chowder

Ingredients:

3 cups corn kernels (apx. 3 – 4 large corn cobs)

5 cups poultry stock (chicken or turkey)
1 large bay leaf
¼ tsp dried thyme
1/8 tsp paprika
1/8 tsp dried dill
1/8 tsp dried summer savory
Pinch cayenne
Pinch curry powder
2½” – 3” piece parmesan cheese rind (optional)

4 slices bacon, fried crisp
2-3 tbsp butter
2/3 cup onion, diced small
½ cup celery, finely chopped
1/3 cup carrot, diced small
¼ cup red pepper, finely chopped
4-6 garlic cloves, minced

½ lb Yukon Gold or red potato, diced into ¼“ pieces

2½ tbsp cornstarch

1 tbsp maple syrup
1 cup 10% blend cream, room temperature
2 tbsp sour cream, room temperature
2/3 cup shredded cheddar cheese
2 tbsp finely grated parmesan cheese
Salt and pepper, to taste

Fresh chives or parsley for garnish (optional)

Method:

With sharp knife, cut the kernels from the corn cobs. Refrigerate kernels.

Place the stripped corn cobs in small stockpot and add the poultry stock, bayleaf, spices, and parmesan rind. Cover. Bring to a boil over medium heat then reduce heat to low and slowly cook mixture for about an hour. Strain mixture in fine wire mesh sieve. Discard cobs and solids.

While the stock is cooking, fry the bacon until crisp. Blot bacon on dry paper towel. When cool break into bite-sized pieces. Set aside for chowder garnish. Remove all but 1½ tablespoons of bacon fat from frypan.

Cut up onion, celery, carrot, and red pepper. Mince the garlic cloves. When stock is almost done cooking, melt butter in the frypan with the bacon fat over medium heat. When butter is melted, add the onions, celery, and carrot. Cook, stirring briskly, for 3-4 minutes then add the red pepper. Cook for another 1-2 minutes, until onion starts to become translucent and the vegetables are slightly softened. Add the minced garlic and cook, stirring continuously, for about 30 seconds, just until the garlic becomes fragrant.

Transfer the sautéed vegetables to a medium-sized stockpot. Add the corn kernels and diced potato. Stir in all of the strained stock except for ½ cup which will be used to mix with the cornstarch to thicken the chowder. Cover stockpot and bring mixture to a boil over high heat then reduce heat to medium low and cook for about 15 minutes, or until the potatoes are just barely fork tender.

Whisk 2½ tbsp cornstarch into the reserved ½ cup of poultry stock until smooth. Add 2-3 tablespoons hot mixture from the stockpot to temper the cornstarch mixture then add the thickener into the stockpot, stirring until mixture starts to thicken.

Transfer approximately 3 cups of the mixture to a blender and purée until very smooth. Pour puréed mixture back into the stock pot. Stir to combine with remainder of unpuréed chowder mixture.

Stir in the maple syrup. Whisk sour cream into the 10% blend cream until blended. Slowly whisk the dairy into the stockpot mixture. Heat thoroughly. Add the cheeses and stir until melted and blended into the chowder. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Ladle chowder into bowls. Garnish with crisp bacon pieces and, if desired, fresh chopped chives or parsley. Serve with rolls or bread.

Yield: Apx. 6-8 servings

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Creamy Homestyle Corn Chowder

Thick, creamy, and hearty made-from-scratch Corn Chowder packed full of flavor. This rich chowder is comfort food at its finest! Serve with favorite rolls or bread.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Canadian
Keyword Corn, Corn Chowder, soup,
Servings 8
My Island Bistro Kitchen Barbara99

Ingredients

  • 3 cups corn kernels (apx. 3 – 4 large corn cobs)
  • 5 cups poultry stock (chicken or turkey)
  • 1 large bay leaf
  • ¼ tsp dried thyme
  • 1/8 tsp paprika
  • 1/8 tsp dried dill
  • 1/8 tsp dried summer savory
  • Pinch cayenne
  • Pinch curry powder
  • 2½ - 3" piece parmesan cheese rind (optional)
  • 4 slices bacon, fried crisp
  • 2-3 tbsp butter
  • 2/3 cup onion, diced small
  • ½ cup celery, finely chopped
  • 1/3 cup carrot, diced small
  • ¼ cup red pepper, finely chopped
  • 4-6 garlic cloves, minced
  • ½ lb Yukon Gold or red potato, diced into ¼“ pieces
  • tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 cup 10% blend cream, room temperature
  • 2 tbsp sour cream, room temperature
  • 2/3 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • 2 tbsp finely grated parmesan cheese
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Fresh chives or parsley for garnish (optional)

Instructions

  1. With sharp knife, cut the kernels from the corn cobs. Refrigerate kernels.
  2. Place the stripped corn cobs in small stockpot and add the poultry stock, bayleaf, spices, and parmesan rind. Cover. Bring to a boil over medium heat then reduce heat to low and slowly cook mixture for about an hour. Strain mixture in fine wire mesh sieve. Discard cobs and solids.
  3. While the stock is cooking, fry the bacon until crisp. Blot bacon on dry paper towel. When cool break into bite-sized pieces. Set aside for chowder garnish. Remove all but 1½ tablespoons of bacon fat from frypan.
  4. Cut up onion, celery, carrot, and red pepper. Mince the garlic cloves. When stock is almost done cooking, melt butter in the frypan with the bacon fat over medium heat. When butter is melted, add the onions, celery, and carrot. Cook, stirring briskly, for 3-4 minutes then add the red pepper. Cook for another 1-2 minutes, until onion starts to become translucent and the vegetables are slightly softened. Add the minced garlic and cook, stirring continuously, for about 30 seconds, just until the garlic becomes fragrant.
  5. Transfer the sautéed vegetables to a medium-sized stockpot. Add the corn kernels and diced potato. Stir in all of the strained stock except for ½ cup which will be used to mix with the cornstarch to thicken the chowder. Cover stockpot and bring mixture to a boil over high heat then reduce heat to medium low and cook for about 15 minutes, or until the potatoes are just barely fork tender.
  6. Whisk 2½ tbsp cornstarch into the reserved ½ cup of poultry stock until smooth. Add 2-3 tablespoons hot mixture from the stockpot to temper the cornstarch mixture then add the thickener into the stockpot, stirring until mixture starts to thicken.
  7. Transfer approximately 3 cups of the mixture to a blender and purée until very smooth. Pour puréed mixture back into the stock pot. Stir to combine with remainder of unpuréed chowder mixture.
  8. Stir in the maple syrup. Whisk sour cream into the 10% blend cream until blended. Slowly whisk the dairy into the stockpot mixture. Heat thoroughly. Add the cheeses and stir until melted and blended into the chowder. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  9. Ladle chowder into bowls. Garnish with crisp bacon pieces and, if desired, fresh chopped chives or parsley. Serve with rolls or bread.

Recipe Notes

Yield: Apx. 6-8 servings

 

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Small gray casserole filled with homemade Corn Chowder garnished with bacon pieces

PEI Lobster Chowder Recipe

Preparing for Setting Day
Eve of Setting Day in the Fishing Village of North Rustico, PEI, Canada

Living where we do, here in PEI, we have access to fresh local lobster and we make the most of it! The lobster fishery plays a major part in PEI’s economy and many people work in one of the many facets of this industry.

PEI Lobsters
Fresh Catch of the Day – PEI Lobsters

We are blessed on the Island with great food from the waters that surround our Island and from the rich red soil of our fertile land.

PEI Potatoes
PEI Potatoes

Combining foods from the sea and land, my recipe for Lobster Chowder features fresh lobster and potatoes, both foods for which PEI is known.  Some creamed corn, milk, cream, and a flavorful lobster stock make this a rich, decadent, and delectable chowder. Follow the step-by-step preparation and cooking directions to create a lobster chowder feast.

Bowl of chowder made with PEI Lobster and Potatoes
PEI Lobster Chowder

Lobster

A cooked lobster, about 1½ pounds, is required for this recipe.  This should yield about 7 – 8 oz of lobster meat needed for the chowder. However, that said, it is always hard to gauge exactly how well filled lobsters will be with meat. To be certain of having enough lobster meat, you may wish to buy a 2-pound lobster (or two one-pounders, about the size of the one shown in the photo below).

Steamed Lobster
Lobster in the Shell

Use lobster fresh from the shell for this chowder because the shells will be needed to make the lobster stock which is the flavorful base for the chowder. The cleaned out shells still have great flavor to them and that flavor is infused into the stock.

When cracking open the lobster, capture any juice that flows as this will enhance the flavor of the lobster stock.

How to Eat Lobster, PEI Style
Cracking Open the Lobster

Refrigerate the lobster meat immediately in a tightly covered container as it will not be used until the latter stage of the chowder making.

Making the Lobster Stock

Remove and discard the head sac (aka grain sac or stomach) (behind the eyes) from the lobster body along with any red roe and green tomally. Enclose the shells inside a clean folded over towel.  Using a hammer or rolling pin, give the shells a few good whacks to break them up somewhat. Cut the lobster legs into 2-3 pieces.

Heat olive oil in a stock pot, then add the lobster shells along with the legs.  Cook for a couple of minutes then add the remainder of the ingredients.  Cover and bring mixture to a boil then reduce heat to simmer for about an hour or so to let the flavor of the stock develop.  Cooking the lobster shells in poultry stock (either chicken or turkey stock) will add a layer of flavor to the stock, more so than just simmering the shells in water. Strain mixture through a very fine wire-mesh sieve and discard the solids.

Using lobster stock (as opposed to clam juice, for example) maintains the authenticity of the lobster chowder and does not introduce another seafood flavour. Besides, why buy a seafood broth or stock when it is quite easy to use the lobster shells you already have to make homemade stock.

Lobster, Potato, and Corn Chowder
PEI Lobster Chowder

Bouquet Garni

A good chowder benefits from some gentle seasoning.  For whole spices like star anise, peppercorns, and allspice, it’s best to contain them in a small sachet.  It beats having to fish around in the chowder to find small peppercorns and allspice or broken bits of star anise or bay leaf.

To make the bouquet garni, use a double layer piece of cheesecloth, about 6” square.  Place spices in center of cheesecloth, gather up the edges to form a little sack or sachet, and secure it with heavy thread.

This sachet will stay in the chowder during its entire cooking time and then will get removed and discarded before serving.

Making the Chowder

Sweating the aromatics (onion, celery, carrots, garlic, and red pepper) in butter draws out their moisture content and releases their flavor, developing a background flavour base for the chowder.  While the whipping cream and creamed corn called for in this recipe will help to thicken the chowder, sprinkling a bit of flour over the vegetables and then stirring in the lobster stock will also help to thicken the chowder.

Use waxy potatoes for chowder.  These would be potatoes like the red-skinned Norland variety, for example. Waxy potatoes are low in starch and will hold their shape better when cooked than will potatoes that have a high starch content. The goal here is to see small chunks of identifiable potato in the chowder.

A blend of whipping cream (35%MF) and whole milk makes this a rich and luxurious chowder.  The whipping cream helps to thicken the chowder meaning less flour is needed. The less flour that is used, the less likely the chowder will have a pasty, starchy taste. A small amount of dry white wine is added to the liquid base of the chowder to complement the lobster’s natural saltiness. It’s all about subtly layering in flavor.

The addition of 10oz of canned creamed corn imparts an element of subtle sweetness to the chowder and also helps to thicken it. If the chowder, however, is still not sufficiently thick for your liking, an additional small amount of flour may be added at this stage.  Be sure to mix it with some water or extra lobster stock and add some of the hot chowder to it to temper it before stirring it into the pot.  This will prevent the chowder from curdling or going lumpy.

One of my go-to seasonings in many dishes is dried summer savory.  Most commonly associated with poultry dishes, this herb is surprisingly versatile and can enhance seafood dishes, like this chowder, as well.

My fresh herbs of choice for this chowder are chives, thyme, dillweed, and parsley.  Not a lot of any of the herbs is needed but small amounts of each do impart an extra layer of flavor depth to the chowder. The key is not to add too much to overpower the dish.

As always, taste the chowder and add any salt and freshly cracked pepper to suit your taste.  Lastly, add the lobster meat and heat the chowder gently over low heat. The lobster is already cooked so it just needs to be heated.  If it was added earlier or cooked too long, it will break apart and lose its lobster flavor.

Tasty Lobster, Potato, and Corn Chowder in Bowl
Lobster Chowder

Serving and Garnishing the Chowder

Ladle the chowder into warm soup bowls.  Garnish with fresh herbs or, to be really luxurious, add a lobster claw to the center of each bowl of chowder.  Serve fresh rolls, biscuits, or artisan bread with this chowder and delight your favorite lobster lovers.

Lobster Chowder Served with Artisan Bread
Lobster Chowder

This chowder can be made ahead and refrigerated up to 2 days. In fact, I think it is always better a day or two after it is made as the flavors have had a chance to mix and mingle to create a really flavorful chowder. To reheat, heat the chowder in the microwave or, alternatively, return chowder to a stockpot and reheat gently over medium-low heat.

[Printable recipe follows at end of post]

PEI Lobster Chowder Recipe

Ingredients:

1½ – 2 lb cooked lobster to yield apx. 7 – 8 oz meat (reserve shells and any juice from the lobster)

Lobster Stock:
Cleaned-out shells, juice, and the legs from cooked lobster
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tsp minced garlic
3” chunk of celery, chopped
2” chunk of carrot, chopped
½ cup yellow onion, chopped
1 bay leaf
3 – 4 sprigs each of fresh thyme and parsley
3 cups poultry stock (chicken or turkey)
1/3 cup dry white wine

Bouquet Garni:
1 star anise pod
1 bay leaf
2 pepper corns
1 whole allspice

Chowder:
3 tbsp butter
1/3 cup onion, finely chopped
1/3 cup celery, finely chopped
1/3 cup carrots, finely diced
2 tbsp red pepper
2 cloves garlic, minced
1½ tbsp flour

2½ cups strained lobster stock (retain any excess stock to thin chowder if it becomes too thick)
1/3 cup dry white wine

1¼ cups waxy potatoes, such as the red-skinned Norland variety, peeled and diced into ½” cubes
½ – ¾ tsp dried summer savory
¾ cup whipping cream (35%MF)
¾ cup whole milk
1 – 10oz can creamed corn
¼ cup Parmesan cheese, finely grated

2½ tsp fresh chives, chopped
1 – 1½ tsp fresh thyme, finely chopped
¾ tsp fresh dillweed, chopped
1 tbsp fresh parsley, finely chopped
1 – 2 tbsp butter
Salt and cracked pepper, to taste

Method:

Lobster Stock:
Remove and discard the head sac (aka grain sac or stomach) (located behind the eyes) from the lobster body, along with any red roe and green tomally. Enclose the shells inside a folded over clean towel. Using a hammer or rolling pin, break up the shells somewhat. Cut the lobster legs into 2-3 pieces.

To make the lobster stock, heat the olive oil in stock pot over medium heat. Add the lobster shells along with the legs. Cook for about 2 minutes then add any juice from the lobster along with the minced garlic, celery, carrot, onion, bay leaf, and sprigs of fresh thyme and parsley. Add the poultry stock and white wine. Cover and bring to a boil then reduce heat to simmer for about an hour. Strain through a fine wire-mesh sieve and discard the solids.

Bouquet Garni:
To make the bouquet garni, use a small piece (apx. 6” square) of double-layer cheesecloth. Place spices in centre of sachet. Gather up corners and tie with heavy thread.

Chowder:
Heat the butter in large heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. When butter is melted, add the onion, celery, carrots, red pepper, and garlic. Sweat the vegetables, stirring frequently, for 2-3 minutes.

Reduce heat to medium-low. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and stir to blend. Cook for a few seconds, stirring constantly to prevent sticking and scorching. Gradually add 2½ cups of the lobster stock along with the white wine, stirring constantly to work out any lumps. Add the potatoes, the bouquet garni, and dried summer savory. Increase heat to medium and bring mixture just to a boil then reduce heat to medium low. Cook for 6-8 minutes or until potatoes are almost, but not quite, fork tender.

Combine the whipping cream and milk. Remove about 1/3 – ½ cup of the hot liquid from the pot and stir into the milk to temper it. Pour tempered milk into hot mixture and stir to combine well. Cook over medium-low heat for about 5 minutes. Add the creamed corn, and Parmesan cheese. Cook for 4-5 minutes, just until mixture is heated. If mixture is not as thick as desired, mix an additional tablespoon of flour in 2½ tablespoons of water or some leftover lobster stock (if any). Add a tablespoon of the hot chowder to temper it and then stir into the chowder in the pot.

Add the lobster meat to the chowder along with the fresh herbs, and butter. Heat for about 2-3 minutes on medium-low temperature. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Remove and discard the bouquet garni. Ladle chowder into warmed bowls and garnish with sprig of parsley and/or chopped chives. Sprinkle lightly with paprika, if desired. Serve with crusty rolls, biscuits, or artisan bread.

Yield: Apx. 4-6 servings

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PEI Lobster Chowder

Printable Recipe:

PEI Lobster Chowder Recipe

This made-from-scratch Lobster Chowder, filled with rich flavours combined with light seasonings, is sure to be a hit with lobster lovers.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Canadian
Keyword chowder, creamed corn, lobster, lobster chowder, potato
Servings 6
My Island Bistro Kitchen My Island Bistro Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 1½ - 2 lb cooked lobster to yield apx. 7 – 8 oz meat (reserve shells and any juice from the lobster)

Lobster Stock:

  • Cleaned-out shells, juice, and the legs from cooked lobster
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp minced garlic
  • 3 ” chunk of celery, chopped
  • 2 ” chunk of carrot, chopped
  • ½ cup yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 – 4 sprigs each of fresh thyme and parsley
  • 3 cups poultry stock (chicken or turkey)
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine

Bouquet Garni:

  • 1 star anise pod
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 pepper corns
  • 1 whole allspice

Chowder:

  • 3 tbsp butter
  • 1/3 cup onion, finely chopped
  • 1/3 cup celery, finely chopped
  • 1/3 cup carrots, finely diced
  • 2 tbsp red pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • tbsp flour
  • cups strained lobster stock (retain any excess stock to thin chowder if it becomes too thick)
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine
  • cups waxy potatoes, such as the red-skinned Norland variety, peeled and diced into ½” cubes
  • ½ - ¾ tsp dried summer savory
  • ¾ cup whipping cream (35%MF)
  • ¾ cup whole milk
  • 1 – 10oz can creamed corn
  • ¼ cup Parmesan cheese, finely grated
  • tsp fresh chives, finely chopped
  • 1 – 1½ tsp fresh thyme, finely chopped
  • ¾ tsp fresh dillweed, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 - 2 tbsp butter
  • Salt and cracked pepper, to taste

Instructions

Lobster Stock:

  1. Remove and discard the head sac (aka grain sac or stomach (located behind the eyes) from the lobster body, along with any red roe and green tomally. Enclose the shells inside a clean folded over towel. Using a hammer or rolling pin, break up the shells somewhat. Cut the lobster legs into 2-3 pieces.

  2. To make the lobster stock, heat the olive oil in stock pot over medium heat. Add the lobster shells along with the legs. Cook for about 2 minutes then add any juice from the lobster along with the minced garlic, celery, carrot, onion, bay leaf, and sprigs of fresh thyme and parsley. Add the poultry stock and white wine. Cover and bring to a boil then reduce heat to simmer for about an hour. Strain through a fine wire-mesh sieve and discard the solids.

Bouquet Garni:

  1. e To make the bouquet garni, use a small piece (apx. 6” square of double-layer cheesecloth. Place spices in centre of sachet. Gather up corners and tie with heavy thread.

Chowder:

  1. Heat the butter in large heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. When butter is melted, add the onion, celery, carrots, red pepper, and garlic. Sweat the vegetables, stirring frequently, for 2-3 minutes.
  2. Reduce heat to medium-low. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and stir to blend. Cook for a few seconds, stirring constantly to prevent sticking and scorching. Gradually add 2½ cups of the lobster stock along with the white wine, stirring constantly to work out any lumps. Add the potatoes, the bouquet garni, and dried summer savory. Increase heat to medium and bring mixture just to a boil then reduce heat to medium low. Cook for 6-8 minutes or until potatoes are almost, but not quite, fork tender.
  3. Combine the whipping cream and milk. Remove about 1/3 – ½ cup of the hot liquid from the pot and stir into the milk to temper it. Pour tempered milk into hot mixture and stir to combine well. Cook over medium-low heat for about 5 minutes. Add the creamed corn, and Parmesan cheese. Cook for 4-5 minutes, just until mixture is heated. If mixture is not as thick as desired, mix an additional tablespoon of flour in 2½ tablespoons of water or some leftover lobster stock (if any). Add a tablespoon of the hot chowder to temper it and then stir into the chowder in the pot.
  4. Add the lobster meat to the chowder along with the fresh herbs, and butter. Heat for about 2-3 minutes on medium-low temperature. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Remove and discard the bouquet garni. Ladle chowder into warmed bowls and garnish with sprig of parsley and/or chopped chives. Sprinkle lightly with paprika, if desired. Serve with crusty rolls, biscuits, or artisan bread.

Recipe Notes

Yield:  Apx. 4-6 servings

Note 1:  Chowder may be refrigerated up to two days.

Note 2:  Be sure to ready the accompanying blog post to this recipe as it contains additional details,  explanation, and tips for making this chowder.

Note 3:  Any leftover lobster stock can be labelled and frozen for a future use.

 

If you like lobster, you may also enjoy these other lobster recipes from My Island Bistro Kitchen:

Lobster and Asparagus Crepes
Lobster Frittata
Lobster Club Sandwich
Lobster Eggs Benedict
Lobster-stuffed Cherry Tomatoes
Lobster Croissants
Lobster Cakes

Turkey Chowder Recipe

Turkey Chowder is the perfect way to use up leftover turkey.  It’s a welcome tummy-warming and tasty chowder for cold winter days and is a real treat after skiing, a long winter walk, snowshoeing, or coasting on the snow-covered hills. Serve with warm rolls or biscuits straight from the oven for an extra special treat.

Homemade Chowder
Turkey Chowder

I make this chowder throughout the year, not just after Christmas or Thanksgiving when I have roasted a turkey.  If you don’t have the leftovers from a turkey, simply buy and roast turkey breasts. Dice up the cooked meat and, voilà, you have the needed turkey for a tasty chowder.

Turkey Chowder
Homemade Turkey Chowder

Apart from the soothing, comfort-food taste, two things I like most about this chowder: First, its simplicity of basic ingredients used and, second, the easy method used to make the chowder.

Like any great soup or chowder, this one starts with the aromatics. The flavor base for this chowder is a basic French Mirepoix. This is nothing more than a combination of three humble vegetables finely chopped and sautéed in butter –  onion, celery, and carrots.  These three veggies alone form the foundational flavor base for many dishes. Ever walk into a home or restaurant and pick up the heady scent of these veggies being sautéed? That’s the French Mirepoix in the making and you just know that something good is going to come from it!  It’s important that the veggies be finely chopped so they will release their flavor and aroma early in the cooking process. It’s also important to allow the necessary time for them to sauté. For example, if all you did was dump all the ingredients for this chowder into a pot all at once, the flavor would be very bland. This is because the onion, celery, and carrots need time to release their flavors and this is what will give the deep, well-rounded flavor in soups or chowders.

Homemade Turkey Chowder
Turkey Chowder

Once the French Mirepoix is well underway, add the next layer of aromatics – the dried summer savory and the garlic salt.  Summer savory is a very common herb to use as a poultry seasoning here on Prince Edward Island and I always have to have summer savory for my poultry stuffing/dressing.  Add the next layer of aromatics – mushrooms and red pepper.  Now you have the flavor base for the chowder.

Chowders are, by nature, thick consistency.  My recipe calls for a couple of tablespoons of all-purpose flour.  The flour is simply sprinkled over the aromatic mixture in the pot and stirred in. This is followed by the addition of chicken stock (or turkey stock if you have used the turkey carcass to make your own) and cubed potato. Make sure you stir the mixture well to ensure there are no lumps forming from the flour – nobody likes a lumpy chowder. The base for the chowder should be silky smooth.  Very slowly add the milk all the while continuing to stir the mixture to keep it lump-free. Don’t boil the chowder but, instead, allow it to heat slowly before adding the cooked turkey, creamed corn which lends a sweetness to the chowder, and grated Parmesan cheese.  Taste the chowder and add salt and pepper to taste, if desired.  The chowder is done when it is heated through, the Parmesan cheese has melted and been incorporated into the chowder, and the cubes of potato are just fork tender – don’t cook them to mush.

This hearty chowder is perfect served with rolls, biscuits, or your favorite crackers.

Turkey Chowder
Homemade Turkey Chowder

[Printable recipe follows at end of posting]

Turkey Chowder

Ingredients:

2 tbsp butter
¾ cup onion, chopped
½ cup celery, chopped
½ cup carrots, diced
3 oz white button mushrooms, sliced
¼ cup red pepper, chopped
1½ – 2 tsp dried summer savory
¾ tsp garlic salt
2 tbsp all-purpose flour
2 cups chicken stock
1 cup potato, diced
1¼ cups milk
2 cup cooked turkey, cubed
1 – 10oz can creamed corn
Sprinkle salt and pepper, to taste
3 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese

Method:

Melt butter in large soup pot.  Add onions, celery, and carrots and cook over medium heat for 3-4 minutes, stirring often. Sprinkle the mixture with summer savory and garlic salt. Increase heat to medium-high and add mushrooms and red pepper and cook 3-4 minutes, continuing to stir vegetables often.

Sprinkle flour over the vegetables and stir for 1-2 minutes.  Add the chicken stock and potato. Bring to a boil, stirring to ensure flour is incorporated and not lumpy.  Reduce heat to medium-low and slowly add the milk while stirring the mixture. Cook, stirring mixture, for approximately 2 minutes.

Add the cooked turkey, creamed corn, salt, pepper, and grated Parmesan.  Heat to melt the cheese and ensure potato is fork tender but do not boil chowder.  Serve hot with rolls, biscuits, or crackers.

Yield: Apx. 4-5 servings

Turkey Chowder Recipe

Yield: Apx. 4-5 servings

A thick, flavorful chowder that uses leftover cooked turkey, aromatic vegetables, creamed corn, and Parmesan cheese, all seasoned with dried summer savory

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp butter
  • ¾ cup onion, chopped
  • ½ cup celery, chopped
  • ½ cup carrots, diced
  • 3 oz white button mushrooms, sliced
  • ¼ cup red pepper, chopped
  • 1½ - 2 tsp dried summer savory
  • ¾ tsp garlic salt
  • 2 tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup potato, diced
  • 1¼ cups milk
  • 2 cup cooked turkey, cubed
  • 1 – 10oz can creamed corn
  • Sprinkle salt and pepper, to taste
  • 3 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. Melt butter in large soup pot. Add onions, celery, and carrots and cook over medium heat for 3-4 minutes, stirring often. Sprinkle the mixture with summer savory and garlic salt. Increase heat to medium-high and add mushrooms and red pepper and cook 3-4 minutes, continuing to stir vegetables often.
  2. Sprinkle flour over the vegetables and stir for 1-2 minutes. Add the chicken stock and potato. Bring to a boil, stirring to ensure flour is incorporated and not lumpy. Reduce heat to medium-low and slowly add the milk while stirring the mixture. Cook, stirring mixture, for approximately 2 minutes.
  3. Add the cooked turkey, creamed corn, salt, pepper, and grated Parmesan. Heat to melt the cheese and ensure potato is fork tender but do not boil chowder. Serve hot with rolls, biscuits, or crackers.
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Turkey Chowder
Turkey Chowder

 

Homemade Turkey Chowder