Rustic Potato, Cheese, and Bacon Pie Recipe

Savory Bacon Pie Served with Salad
Rustic Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie Served with a Green Salad

This Rustic Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie is simply delectable. As I write this post, it is Food Day Canada, a day set aside to acknowledge all the wonderful foods produced in Canada. While, usually, I celebrate the day with seafood for which Prince Edward Island is well known, I thought it was time that I featured another food for which the Island is famous – potatoes!

What is a Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie?

This is a savory pie and there is no pastry involved in this pie. Instead, the bacon slices form the casing in which the layers of potatoes will bake with the cheese and some light seasonings. This savory pie is very versatile as it is tasty served with a green salad for brunch, lunch, or dinner.

I do have lots of hints and tips for making my version of a successful Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie. That said, it’s advisable, before beginning to make the pie, to read and re-read the recipe, notes, and this post a couple of times to ensure understanding of the process and that all ingredients, tools, and appropriate baking dish are at hand.

Bacon – Yes, two pounds (yes, two whole pounds!) of thinly sliced bacon will be required for this pie! No, it isn’t a typo! Why is so much bacon needed? The bacon forms a casing for the potato and cheese filling so the bacon slices have to be positioned close together, with each slice just slightly overlapping each other and with no gaps in between slices. Thin slices of bacon work best because they are more malleable and easier to fit into the pan than would thick bacon. Room temperature bacon also works better than cold bacon when fitting the slices into the pan so set the bacon on the counter for 30-35 minutes to take the chill off before placing it in the baking dish.

Because there is a lot of bacon going into this pie (yup, 2 pounds – did I mention that???), if all the pieces of bacon started in the center of the baking dish, there would be too big a mound of bacon in the center. To alleviate this, start placing one end of a bacon strip in the center of the baking dish and allowing it to come up and over the sides of the dish and rest the remainder of the slice on the counter. Start placement of the second strip of bacon about 1½“ or so back from the dish’s center point. Then, the next strip of bacon can start back at the center point and the next one, 1½“ back. Continue this placement with the rest of the bacon in a spoke wheel/radial fashion all around the dish until the bottom and sides of the baking dish are completely covered with the bacon.

Bacon-lined pie plate ready for potato and cheese filling

Once the potato and cheese filling has been added to the pie, pull each individual bacon strip end up and completely cover, in radial fashion, the filling with bacon, slightly overlapping each bacon slice. Ensure the bacon completely covers and encases the potato-cheese filling. Don’t worry if you find you have more bacon ends than will precisely fit a tidy, picture-perfect radial formation on the pie top. Remember, this is a rustic style savory pie so just fit any stray bacon pieces on top of the pie as best you can. The important thing is to have the filling completely encased in the bacon.

Potato and Bacon Pie
Bacon Encasing for Potato, Cheese, and Bacon Pie

Because bacon is well known for its shrinkage as it cooks, placing a weight on top of the pie will help to keep the bacon in place as the pie cooks. It won’t completely allievate all shrinkage but it will help. A heavy-weight, oven-proof pot lid cover will work well for this. Cut a 6” circle of parchment paper to place between the bacon and the weight to keep the bacon from sticking to the pot lid or other weight used. This weight will get removed partway through the baking to allow the bacon to properly cook and the pie to bake all the way through.

Savory Pie Ready for the Oven
Weighing down Potato, Cheese, and Bacon Pie to prevent bacon from shrinking during baking.

The bacon will render out a lot of fat as the pie bakes. Don’t be alarmed when you see it! Periodically scoop out the rendered fat that has accrued around the pie edges during the baking process.

Potatoes – I find waxy varieties of potatoes work best in this pie as they hold their shape and don’t become mushy. I use either Yukon Gold or Red Norland variety but any similar waxy variety would work well. I recommend using a mandolin for making quick and consistent slicing of the potatoes. I suggest a thickness of about 1/8” slices. I have indicated approximately 2 pounds of potatoes will be needed for this pie. Use that as a gauge only as more or less weight of potatoes may be required depending on the type of potato used, the thickness of the peeling removed from them, how thick the potatoes are actually cut and how they are placed in the dish, as well as the shape and depth of the baking dish. I suggest peeling and slicing 1¼ pounds of potatoes to start and then peel and slice more as and if they are needed.

Preparing the filling for a potato pie
Placing sliced potatoes in concentric circles in Potato, Cheese, and Bacon Pie

Each layer of potatoes is just a single layer though the potatoes should be placed in concentric circles, starting around the outer edge of the baking dish, with each potato slice slightly overlapping each other by approximately ¼” – 1/3” (I don’t measure – it’s just a gauge!). The pie is a build into a domed shape so start the first two layers at the outer edge of the dish and, when it gets to layer three of potatoes and each subsequent layer, begin placement of the potatoes in about ½” – ¾“ in from the outer edge of the previous layer as shown in photo below.

Filling for savory potato pie
Preparing filling for Potato, Cheese, and Bacon Pie

Use hands to press down each layer of potatoes to compress and compact it in preparation for the next layer of potatoes. Once all the potato layers have been added, the pie will have a domed/mountainous shape and will be higher than the baking dish sides. The potatoes will shrink down as they cook so the baked pie will not be nearly as high as it starts out, uncooked.

Savory Potato and Bacon Pie
Rustic Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie

The photo below is how it starts out.

Savory Pie Ready for the Oven
Savory Potato, Cheese, and Bacon Pie Ready for the Oven

And, the photo below is how it ends up! Yes, the filling really does cook down that much!

Savory Bacon Pie in Pie Plate
Baked Potato, Cheese, and Bacon Pie

Cheese – Any good hard, melting cheese will work in this pie. Cheeses such as aged white cheddar or Gruyère are good choices. I like to use a mixture of both as I find their flavors complement each other well in this pie. The addition of finely grated Parmesan Cheese adds another layer of flavoring.

Cheese Layer of Savory Pie
Layer of Cheese in Potato, Cheese, and Bacon Pie

Seasonings – I don’t add a lot of seasonings to this pie. Finely chopped onion, minced garlic, Herbes de Provence, and a sprinkle of chicken bouillon powder are it, along with some salt and pepper, of course.

Pan – A large 10” pie plate (high-sided, deep-dish style) or an ovenproof skillet of the same diameter will be needed for this pie. There are a number of layers going in to fill the baking dish so make sure whatever baking vessel is used, it is the deep-dish style. A large rimmed baking sheet lined with tin foil (for easy clean-up) will also be needed to place the pie plate/skillet on as there will be a lot of fat rendering from the bacon and the pan will serve to catch any that flows out.

Rest Time – After removing the pie from the oven, let it rest in the baking dish for 10-15 minutes to set. During this time, continue to scoop out any rendered fat that appears.

Slicing and Serving the Pie – The pie is easier cut if transferred to a cutting board and I recommend one that has a juice groove/drain canal as it is likely there will still be some rendered bacon fat that will transfer with the pie. It’s a good idea to have some paper towels at the ready! I typically grab the parchment paper lining and carefully slide the pie out of the baking dish and onto the cutting board.

Baked Savory Pie Ready for Slicing
Baked Rustic Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie

Serve the Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie hot alongside a green salad of choice.

Bacon and Potato Pie with Salad
Baked Rustic Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie

Ready for a taste?

Slice of savory potato pie
Rustic Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie

The only thing better than a photo of the pie is a taste! Want to enjoy it in your own kitchen? The recipe is below and a printable recipe follows at end of post.

Fork full of Bacon and Potato Pie
Bite of Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie

Rustic Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie

Ingredients:

2 lbs thinly sliced bacon, room temperature
Apx. 2 lbs waxy potatoes (e.g., Yukon Gold or Red Norlands), peeled and sliced apx. 1/8“ thick (See Note 1 below)
¾ lb hard, melting cheese (e.g., aged white cheddar, Gruyère, or a mixture of both), shredded
2 oz finely grated Parmesan cheese

2/3 – ¾ cup finely chopped onion
3 – 5 garlic cloves, minced
1½ tsp Herbes de Provence
¾ tsp chicken bouillon powder

Fine sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
Cooking oil

Method:

Set bacon on counter for about 30-35 minutes to remove the chill and make it malleable to place in the baking dish.

In small bowl, mix the onion, minced garlic cloves, Herbes de Provence, and chicken bouillon powder together. Set aside.

In separate bowl, mix cheeses together well to combine. Set aside.

Line a deep-sided 10” pie plate or oven-proof skillet of the same diameter with parchment paper cut to neatly and tidily fit the pie plate or skillet. Lightly spray baking dish with cooking oil to hold parchment paper in place.

Cover baking dish bottom with the bacon. Start in the center of the dish and lay an end of a strip of bacon flat, extending it up and over the side of the dish, and rest the overhang on the counter. Slightly overlapping the first slice, start the placement of the second slice about 1½“ or so back from the center of the baking dish to avoid a build-up mound of bacon in the center of the dish. Lay the end of the next slice back in the dish’s center. Continue placing the bacon in the dish, in this spoke wheel like fashion, staggering every second slice back about 1½“ or so from the center, and slightly overlapping each slice to ensure full coverage of the dish.

Position oven rack in center of oven and preheat oven to 350°F.

Peel potatoes and slice into slices about 1/8“ thick. (See Note 1 below)

Spread a scant ½ cup of the cheese mixture over the bacon in the dish. Starting around the outside edge of the dish, create concentric circles of single layers of the potatoes, overlapping each potato slice by about ¼“ – 1/3”. When dish has been completely covered with a single layer of potatoes, gently compress potato layer with hands. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and top with one-third of the onion-garlic-seasoning mixture followed with one-third of the cheese mixture.

Add second layer of potatoes in the same configuration as the first layer. Compress potato layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and top with one-third of the onion-garlic mixture followed by one-third of the cheese mixture.

Add third layer of potatoes, but this time starting in about ½” – ¾” from the outer edge of the previous layer of potatoes. Compress potato layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and top with the remaining onion-garlic mixture followed by the remaining cheese mixture.

Add one final layer of potatoes, again starting in about ½” – ¾” from the outer edge of the last layer of potatoes. Compress potato layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. The potato filling will have a dome shape and will be higher than the pie plate/skillet sides but will shrink down as the pie bakes.

Fold the bacon overhang ends up from the counter and over the mounded potato-cheese filling in a radial/spoke wheel fashion, slightly overlapping each bacon slice, and completely covering the potato and cheese filling.

Place a 6” circle of parchment paper on top of pie and weigh down with a heavy, oven-safe pot lid cover or other oven- and food-safe weight to keep bacon in place during baking. Place pie on tinfoil-lined, rimmed baking sheet to catch any bacon fat that might overflow the baking dish during baking. Transfer pie to oven and bake for 1½ hours then remove pot lid and 6” parchment paper circle and bake pie for 1¼ – 1½ hours longer, or until a knife inserted into center of pie inserts easily without resistance. Periodically check pie as it bakes and scoop out excess rendered fat from the bacon. If bacon becomes too crispy before pie is done, tent pie loosely with tin foil.

Let pie rest in pie plate or skillet for 10-15 minutes, continuing to remove any rendered fat that appears during the rest period. Grasp edges of parchment paper lining and carefully slide pie from pie plate/skillet onto cutting board that has a juice groove or drip canal on the edge to catch any remaining fat drippings. Slice pie into wedges and serve hot with a side salad of choice.

Yield: 6-8 servings

NOTES:
1. For uniform potato slices, use a mandolin. Slices about 1/8” thick work well in this dish. Various kinds of potatoes can be used in this pie but waxy potatoes will hold their shape well. It’s difficult to say exactly the quantity of potatoes needed for the recipe as it depends on many factors including their quality, how much peeling is removed, the size and shape of the baking dish used, how thick the potatoes are actually sliced, and how they are arranged in the baking dish. I suggest having approximately 2 pounds of potatoes available though they may not all be needed. Start by peeling and slicing 1¼ pounds and peel and slice as many more as may be needed for the layers after using the 1¼ pounds.
2. Use hard melting cheeses in this recipe. Use all one kind of cheese or use more than one to increase/vary the flavor. Good choices are a well-aged white cheddar and/or Gruyère.
3. Bacon that has been brought to room temperature will mold more easily into the baking dish than will cold bacon.
4. Use thinly sliced bacon (versus thick) for this dish. Thin cut bacon is easier to mold into the baking dish and there is a lot of bacon! Make sure to stagger every second slice of bacon back about 1½“ or so from the dish’s center to avoid a built-up mound of bacon in the center of the dish. Slightly overlap each slice to form a solid casing of bacon for the filling.
5. Use an oven-safe and food-safe weight to weigh down the pie. A heavy oven-proof pot lid works well. Bacon shrinks as it cooks and the weight will help to keep it in place as it cooks.

If you have made this recipe and enjoyed it and/or wish to share it with your friends and family, please do so on social media but be sure to share the direct link to this posting from my website.

Like potatoes? You may also enjoy these other delicious potato recipes from My Island Bistro Kitchen:

Decadent Duchess Potatoes
Twice-Baked Potatoes
Creamy Scalloped Potatoes
Tuna Stuffed Potatoes
Roasted Potato Stacks
Bistro-style Potato Patties
PEI Potato Leek Soup
PEI Potato Salad
Chocolate Potato Cake

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Rustic Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie

A savory pie, this Rustic Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie is made with layers of sliced potatoes, cheese, and light seasonings all encased in a bacon crust and baked in the oven. Serve hot with side salad of choice.

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs thinly sliced bacon, room temperature
  • Apx. 2 lbs waxy potatoes (e.g., Yukon Gold or Red Norlands), peeled and sliced apx. 1/8“ thick (See Note 1 below)
  • ¾ lb hard, melting cheese (e.g., aged white cheddar, Gruyère, or a mixture of both), shredded
  • 2 oz finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2/3 - ¾ cup finely chopped onion
  • 3 - 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • tsp Herbes de Provence
  • ¾ tsp chicken bouillon powder
  • Fine sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
  • Cooking oil

Instructions

  1. Set bacon on counter for about 30-35 minutes to remove the chill and make it malleable to place in the baking dish.
  2. In small bowl, mix the onion, minced garlic cloves, Herbes de Provence, and chicken bouillon powder together. Set aside.
  3. In separate bowl, mix cheeses together well to combine. Set aside.
  4. Line a deep-sided 10” pie plate or oven-proof skillet of the same diameter with parchment paper cut to neatly and tidily fit the pie plate or skillet. Lightly spray pan with cooking oil to hold parchment paper in place.
  5. Cover baking dish bottom with the bacon. Start in the center of the dish and lay an end of a strip of bacon flat, extending it up and over the side of the dish, and rest the overhang on the counter. Slightly overlapping the first slice, start the placement of the second slice about 1½“ or so back from the center of the baking dish to avoid a build-up mound of bacon in the center of the dish. Lay the end of the next slice back in the dish’s center. Continue placing the bacon in the dish, in this spoke wheel like fashion, staggering every second slice back about 1½“ or so from the center, and slightly overlapping each slice to ensure full coverage of the dish.
  6. Position oven rack in center of oven and preheat oven to 350°F.
  7. Peel potatoes and slice into slices about 1/8“ thick. (See Note 1 below)
  8. Spread a scant ½ cup of the cheese mixture over the bacon in the dish. Starting around the outside edge of the dish, create concentric circles of single layers of the potatoes, overlapping each potato slice by about ¼“ - 1/3”. When dish has been completely covered with a single layer of potatoes, gently compress potato layer with hands. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and top with one-third of the onion-garlic-seasoning mixture followed with one-third of the cheese mixture.
  9. Add second layer of potatoes in the same configuration as the first layer. Compress potato layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and top with one-third of the onion-garlic mixture followed by one-third of the cheese mixture.
  10. Add third layer of potatoes, but this time starting in about ½” - ¾” from the outer edge of the previous layer of potatoes. Compress potato layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and top with the remaining onion-garlic mixture followed by the remaining cheese mixture.
  11. Add one final layer of potatoes, again starting in about ½” - ¾” from the outer edge of the last layer of potatoes. Compress potato layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. The potato filling will have a dome shape and will be higher than the pie plate/skillet sides but will shrink down as the pie bakes.
  12. Fold the bacon overhang ends up from the counter and over the mounded potato-cheese filling in a radial/spoke wheel fashion, slightly overlapping each bacon slice, and completely covering the potato and cheese filling.
  13. Place a 6” circle of parchment paper on top of pie and weigh down with a heavy, oven-safe pot lid cover or other oven- and food-safe weight to keep bacon in place during baking. Place pie on tinfoil-lined, rimmed baking sheet to catch any bacon fat that might overflow the baking dish during baking. Transfer pie to oven and bake for 1½ hours then remove pot lid and 6” parchment paper circle and bake pie for 1¼ - 1½ hours longer, or until a knife inserted into center of pie inserts easily without resistance. Periodically check pie as it bakes and scoop out excess rendered fat from the bacon. If bacon becomes too crispy before pie is done, tent pie loosely with tin foil.
  14. Let pie rest in pie plate or skillet for 10-15 minutes, continuing to remove any rendered fat that appears during the rest period. Grasp edges of parchment paper lining and carefully slide pie from pie plate/skillet onto cutting board that has a juice groove or drip canal on the edge to catch any remaining fat drippings. Slice pie into wedges and serve hot with a side salad of choice.

Recipe Notes

Yield: 6-8 servings

NOTES:
1. For uniform potato slices, use a mandolin. Slices about 1/8” thick work well in this dish. Various kinds of potatoes can be used in this pie but waxy potatoes will hold their shape well. It’s difficult to say exactly the quantity of potatoes needed for the recipe as it depends on many factors including their quality, how much peeling is removed, the size and shape of the baking dish used, how thick the potatoes are actually sliced, and how they are arranged in the baking dish. I suggest having approximately 2 pounds of potatoes available though they may not all be needed. Start by peeling and slicing 1¼ pounds and peel and slice as many more as may be needed for the layers after using the 1¼ pounds.
2. Use hard melting cheeses in this recipe. Use all one kind of cheese or use more than one to increase/vary the flavor. Good choices are a well-aged white cheddar and/or Gruyère.
3. Bacon that has been brought to room temperature will mold more easily into the baking dish than will cold bacon.
4. Use thinly sliced bacon (versus thick) for this dish. Thin cut bacon is easier to mold into the baking dish and there is a lot of bacon! Make sure to stagger every second slice of bacon back about 1½“ or so from the dish’s center to avoid a built-up mound of bacon in the center of the dish. Slightly overlap each slice to form a solid casing of bacon for the filling.
5. Use an oven-safe and food-safe weight to weigh down the pie. A heavy oven-proof pot lid works well. Bacon shrinks as it cooks and the weight will help to keep it in place as it cooks.

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Savory Bacon Pie
Bacon, Cheese, and Potato Pie