Tag Archives: chive vinegar

Homemade Chive Vinegar Recipe

Chives, a perennial plant related to onions, are one of the season’s earliest gems. I generally cut back part of the patch to keep the chives producing all season long.  But, letting some of the chives reach the flower blossom stage has its perks, too.

Patch of Chives
Chives

As they mature, chives will produce long stems that become somewhat hard and tough. Those stems produce fabulous lavender-hued edible blossoms.  Those are the blossoms that I harvest to make chive vinegar.  It just seems so wasteful not to make good use of them. And, when you see the color of the vinegar, you’ll understand why this is a prized commodity in my pantry.

Chive Patch
Chive Blossoms

Chive vinegar is super easy to make and it will have a subtle onion essence.  All that is required is about 80-100 chive blossoms that are pesticide free and 1½ cups of a good quality colorless, neutral, unflavored vinegar such as white wine vinegar or champagne vinegar. No special equipment and no special skillsets are required.

Snip the chive blossoms just below their heads.  I generally leave about a 1” stem on just a few of the blossoms for a little extra flavor.  Swish and wash the blossoms in a bowl of cool water then dry them in a salad spinner.

Chive Blossoms in Salad Spinner
Chive Blossoms

Lay the blossoms, single layer, on a tea towel and let them air dry for about an hour or so. Use a meat pounder mallet to slightly crush the blossoms to hasten the release of their flavor.

Stuff the blossoms into a 2-cup glass jar and add the vinegar.  Use the end of a wooden spoon to reposition the blossoms, if necessary, to make room for all of the vinegar.

Mason Jar Filled with Chive Blossoms and Vinegar
Steeping Chive Blossoms in Vinegar

Do not use a metal lid to cover the jar as it can react with the vinegar.  Instead, use a double layer of plastic wrap to cover the jar and secure the wrap with an elastic band.  Store the jar in a cool dark place for a couple of weeks to let the chives infuse the vinegar with flavor and for the vinegar to turn the most stunning shade imaginable.

Every couple of days, give the jar a gentle shake or two to move the vinegar in and around the chive blossoms. The color of the vinegar will develop very quickly but, like its flavor, will deepen the longer you let the chive blossoms steep in the vinegar.

Once the infusion period is up, strain the vinegar from the blossoms.  You can use either a wet cheesecloth lined fine wire mesh sieve or you can line the sieve with a paper coffee filter.  Decant the vinegar into a sterilized bottle that has a non-metallic lid such as a rubber stopper (as shown in the photo below) or a cork. Store away from light.

Bottle of Homemade Chive Vinegar
Homemade Chive Vinegar

Use chive vinegar in any way or recipe you would use any vinegar.

For example, it makes a fantastic vinaigrette, especially for those main meal summer salads.

Plate of Salad with Bottle of Chive Vinegar and Small Jug of Vinaigrette in background
Vinaigrette Made with Homemade Chive Vinegar

A light drizzle of the chive vinegar over a potato salad adds an extra punch of flavor.

Bowl of Potato Salad with Bottle of Chive Vinegar in Background
Homemade Potato Salad Drizzled with Chive Vinegar

The vinegar can also be used in marinades, tossed with roasted veggies or over French fries, or for quick pickling of cucumber or red onion.  This vinegar also makes a lovely host/hostess gift from your kitchen. Just look at the fabulous color of the vinegar and it’s all natural from the chive blossoms. No artificial coloring has been used.

Bottle of Chive Vinegar
Chive Vinegar as a Host or Hostess Gift

[Printable recipe follows at end of post]

Chive Vinegar

Ingredients:

Apx. 80-100 chive blossoms, including a few buds
1½ cups white wine vinegar or champagne vinegar

Method:

Snip blossoms from chive plants, just beneath the blossom heads. If desired, leave about 1” stem on a few of the blossoms for extra flavor. Wash blossoms in large bowl of cold water and spin dry in salad spinner. Transfer blossoms to tea towel to air dry for about an hour or so.

Use a meat pounder mallet to lightly crush the blossoms and buds to release their flavor.

Transfer blossoms and buds to a 2-cup glass jar. Fill with vinegar. Using the end of a wooden spoon, push down and redistribute the  blossoms to make room for the vinegar.

Cover the jar with plastic wrap secured with a rubber band. Do not use a metal lid which can react with the vinegar. Place the jar in a dark, cool location and let it steep for 2 weeks to allow the flavor and color of the chive vinegar to develop. Over the two weeks, periodically give the bottle a gentle shake or two to redistribute contents.

Strain the steeped vinegar through a wet cheesecloth-lined fine wire mesh sieve (or line the sieve with a paper coffee filter). Discard the old blossoms and buds. Decant the vinegar into a sterilized bottle that has a non-metallic lid such as a rubber stopper or cork.

Yield: Apx. 1 1/3 cups

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Chive Vinegar

Chive-infused vinegar is easy to make and is a wonderful addition to the cook's pantry. Use it just as you would any vinegar. Especially good in vinaigrettes and marinades and tossed with French fries and roasted vegetables.
Course Condiment
Keyword chives, homemade chive vinegar
Author My Island Bistro Kitchen

Ingredients

  • Apx. 80-100 chive blossoms, including a few buds
  • cups white wine vinegar or champagne vinegar

Instructions

  1. Snip blossoms from chive plants, just beneath the blossom heads. If desired, leave about 1” stem on a few of the blossoms for extra flavor. Wash blossoms in large bowl of cold water and spin dry in salad spinner. Transfer blossoms to tea towel to air dry for about an hour or so.
  2. Use a meat pounder mallet to lightly crush the blossoms and buds to release their flavor.
  3. Transfer blossoms and buds to a 2-cup glass jar. Fill with vinegar. Using the end of a wooden spoon, push down and redistribute the blossoms to make room for the vinegar.
  4. Cover the jar with plastic wrap secured with a rubber band. Do not use a metal lid which can react with the vinegar. Place the jar in a dark, cool location and let it steep for 2 weeks to allow the flavor and color of the chive vinegar to develop. Over the two weeks, periodically give the bottle a gentle shake or two to redistribute contents.
  5. Strain the steeped vinegar through a wet cheesecloth-lined fine wire mesh sieve (or line the sieve with a paper coffee filter). Discard the old blossoms and buds. Decant the vinegar into a sterilized bottle that has a non-metallic lid such as a rubber stopper or cork.

Recipe Notes

Yield: Apx. 1 1/3 cups

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Chive Vinegar