Luscious Lime Curd Recipe

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Glass jar filled with Lime Curd
Luscious Lime Curd

Sharper and with a tangier taste than lemon curd, lime curd (in its natural state) is a slightly duller color than the traditional lemon curd with which most people are probably more familiar. One would think lime curd would automatically have a lime green color but this is not the case as the juice from limes is actually a very pale bland color. I added just a touch of green gel icing coloring to brighten up the curd and give it a pretty lime green color, more consistent to what might be expected of the appearance of a lime curd.

Three small serving jars filled with Lime Curd, Clotted Cream, and Strawberry Jam
Lime Curd, Clotted Cream, and Strawberry Jam Ready for Scones

Adding color to the curd is optional and it won’t alter the citrus flavor of the curd but it will enhance the color and certainly give it a lime green shade. As a word of caution, the gel colors (I don’t recommend liquid food/icing colors at all) are highly pigmented so only the tiniest of the gel on the tip of a toothpick will be needed. Start out with a lot smaller pinch of the color than you think is needed and slowly add, if required, a smidgen of the gel coloring until it reaches the shade desired (I used Wilton’s Kelly Green gel icing color in the curd in the photos that mixed with the natural pale yellowish color of the lime juice to produce the pretty lime green color of the curd).

Scone topped with lime curd and clotted cream
Lime Curd as a Scone Topping

Be prepared to devote some time and patience to making any curd. It cooks slowly over a pot of simmering (never boiling) water to reach its finished stage. I typically cook my curds until they reach 170°F on a candy thermometer. I cooked this one a wee bit longer, until the temperature registered 175° on a candy thermometer, as I wanted this curd a tad thicker for some of the uses to which I was planning to put it. However, anywhere between 170°F – 175°F will produce a lovely spreadable curd. You may wish to read my previous postings on making lemon curd and rhubarb curd (links below) for hints and tips on make curd as the same techniques apply to the making of lime curd.

Jar of Lime Curd Ready to Fill French Macarons
French Macarons Filled with Lime Curd and Buttercream

Use this lime curd in the same way in which you would use lemon, rhubarb, or clementine curd — as a traditional spread on scones, muffins, toast, or even on pancakes or waffles; as a filling for cakes; in a parfait with Greek yogurt; as a filling for tarts, cookies, and French Macarons; dolloped over a New York style cheesecake or slices of pound cake served with fresh fruit; or as a filling in meringue nests.

French Macarons with Cup of Tea
French Macarons Filled with Lime Curd and Buttercream

Bottle the curd in a decorative jar and you have a lovely thinking-of-you or hostess gift for someone, especially if you include a batch of homemade scones with it (links to scone recipes below).

Lime Curd on Slice of Cheesecake
New York Cheesecake Topped with Lime Curd

If you love the flavor of lime, you will love this show-stopping, colorful lime curd and find ever-so-many creative uses for it.

Tea Table with Scones and Lime Curd
Lime Curd, Strawberry Jam, and Clotted Cream on Scones

[Printable recipe follows at end of posting]

Luscious Lime Curd

Ingredients:

¾ cup + 1 tbsp caster* sugar or granulated sugar
3 tsp lime zest
7 tbsp freshly squeezed lime juice, strained (apx. 2 – 3 limes, depending on size and juiciness)
2 extra-large egg yolks, room temperature
1 large whole egg, room temperature
3½ tbsp unsalted butter, room temperature

Green gel icing color (optional)

Method:

In bottom of double boiler, bring about 2” of water to the simmering point (around 200°F – see Note below). Maintain the water at this simmering point over medium-low heat. Place sugar in top of double boiler or heat-proof bowl. Mix in the lime zest. Whisk the lime juice into the sugar.

In small bowl, lightly beat the 2 egg yolks and the whole egg together with a fork, just enough to break up the yolks and blend them with the whole egg. Whisk the eggs into the sugar-lime juice mixture. Add the soft butter. Place this pot or bowl over the simmering water. Stir the mixture continuously as it cooks until it is thickened and the temperature of the mixture registers 175°F on a candy thermometer. Be patient as this will take awhile. Make sure the water in the bottom of the boiler does not boil and stays only at the simmering point.

Remove curd from heat and strain through a mesh strainer to remove any of the egg white that may have coagulated as well as the lime zest. Pour strained curd into a sterilized bottle. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the curd to prevent it from forming a skin on top. Cool at room temperature. Remove plastic wrap. Cover jar tightly and refrigerate for up to 1 week.

Yield: Apx. 1 cup

*caster sugar may also be known as fruit sugar, berry sugar, super fine sugar, or instant dissolving sugar. For best results and an exceptionally satiny-smooth textured curd, I recommend using this super-fine sugar in all curd recipes.

Note: Altitude may affect the temperature at which the water reaches the simmering point. The important thing is that the water in the bottom of the double boiler does not boil or touch the top of the double boiler/heatproof bowl during the cooking of the curd.

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Jar Full of Lime Curd

Luscious Lime Curd

Similar to lemon curd but with a tangier taste, this wonderful Lime Curd is versatile and, in addition to being used as a topping for scones, has many uses.
Course Afternoon Tea
Cuisine Canadian
My Island Bistro Kitchen Barbara99

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup + 1 tbsp caster* sugar or granulated sugar
  • 3 tsp lime zest
  • 7 tbsp freshly squeezed lime juice, strained (apx. 2 - 3 limes, depending on size and juiciness)
  • 2 extra-large egg yolks, room temperature
  • 1 large whole egg, room temperature
  • tbsp unsalted butter, room temperature
  • Green gel icing color (optional)

Instructions

  1. In bottom of double boiler, bring about 2” of water to the simmering point (around 200°F - see Note below). Maintain the water at this simmering point over medium-low heat. Place sugar in top of double boiler or heat-proof bowl. Mix in the lime zest. Whisk the lime juice into the sugar.
  2. In small bowl, lightly beat the 2 egg yolks and the whole egg together with a fork, just enough to break up the yolks and blend them with the whole egg. Whisk the eggs into the sugar-lime juice mixture. Add the soft butter. Place this pot or bowl over the simmering water. Stir the mixture continuously as it cooks until it is thickened and the temperature of the mixture registers 175°F on a candy thermometer. Be patient as this will take awhile. Make sure the water in the bottom of the boiler does not boil and stays only at the simmering point.
  3. Remove curd from heat and strain through a mesh strainer to remove any of the egg white that may have coagulated as well as the lime zest. Pour strained curd into a sterilized bottle. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the curd to prevent it from forming a skin on top. Cool at room temperature. Remove plastic wrap. Cover jar tightly and refrigerate for up to 1 week.

Recipe Notes

Yield: Apx. 1 cup

*caster sugar may also be known as fruit sugar, berry sugar, super fine sugar, or instant dissolving sugar. For best results and an exceptionally satiny-smooth textured curd, I recommend using this super-fine sugar in all curd recipes.

Note: Altitude may affect the temperature at which the water reaches the simmering point. The important thing is that the water in the bottom of the double boiler does not boil or touch the top of the double boiler/heatproof bowl during the cooking of the curd.

You may also enjoy these other curd recipes from My Island Bistro Kitchen:

Lemon Curd
Rhubarb Curd
Clementine Curd

These curds are wonderful on scones. Here are links to both my basic scone recipe and my gluten-free version:

Currant and Orange Scones
Gluten-free Scones

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