Category Archives: Beef

My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Irish Stew

I love a bowl of rich Irish Stew any time of the year but, for certain, I will make it around St. Patrick’s Day! It’s a filling and tummy-warming stew that is always a welcome sight on the dinner table.

Irish Stew
My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Irish Stew

According to my research, traditional Irish Stew was made with cheap cuts of mutton or lamb and basic root vegetables like carrots, potatoes, onions, and turnips. Years ago, these would have been ingredients that were, no doubt, simply what would have been available at the time in the Irish countryside where sheep were raised for their wool and for food and when, before the potato famine, potatoes were a primary Irish crop.

Over the years, Irish Stew recipes have changed according to the locale and what ingredients are available in the cook’s local area.  For example, beef is often used in North America today instead of lamb in Irish Stew and other ingredients are added to make a more flavourful, hearty stew as opposed to a broth-like dish.  Purists might argue that these changes result in a brand new stew recipe altogether and is something entirely different than the original Irish Stew.

Regardless what it is called, I like my version of Irish Stew!  It has a nice rich, robust flavour and a splendid reddish-brown color that comes primarily from the addition of tomato paste with the aid of some red wine and the Guinness.  Using Guinness and red wine also helps to tenderize the meat and also adds to the flavour of the stew.  I don’t add huge amounts of either as the intent is not to “drown” the natural flavours of the beef and veggies but rather to blend and enhance flavours.

Any kind of potato can be diced and used in this recipe.  However, with the ready availability of mini potatoes in recent years, I like to use the tiny potatoes left whole with peelings on. I think they add an interesting element to the stew. If you can’t find the really small, mini potatoes, use slightly larger small potatoes sliced in half, lengthwise.

Irish Stew
My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Irish Stew

The nice thing about Irish Stew (once you have all the veggies cut up) is that it is an all-encompassing meal with all the vegetables in one dish (no worries about getting different pots of vegetables all cooked at the same time for the meal and a real bonus of only having one pot to wash).  This meal-in-one stew really needs nothing more for a hearty meal than a slice of bread, rolls, or garlic bread and perhaps some homemade mustard pickles on the side.

I like to slow-cook this stew in the oven at 325°F for a couple of hours as opposed to cooking it on the cooktop.  I find oven-cooking allows the flavours to slowly blend and the stew to gradually thicken as it cooks. The longer the stew cooks, the thicker the sauce will be but the stew should be cooked only until the vegetables are fork-tender, not mushy. If the sauce has not all cooked up with the vegetables (some varieties of potatoes, for example, will soak up more sauce than others), it makes a great dipping sauce for the bread or rolls!

Irish Stew
My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Irish Stew

[Printable recipe follows at end of post]

My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Irish Stew

Ingredients
3/4 pound stew beef chopped
1 – 1½ tbsp olive oil

1 cup carrots sliced
2/3 cup parsnips, sliced or diced
1/2 cup onion, chopped
1 cup turnip, diced
1 leek sliced  (white and light green part only)
3 cups potatoes, diced OR 1 lb mini potatoes (left whole)

1 tbsp sugar
1 tsp Herbs de Provence
1 tsp garlic, minced
1 – 5.5 oz can tomato paste
1 – 10 oz can beef consommé
1 tsp Worcestershire Sauce
1/2 cup red wine
1/2 cup Guinness
1 cup water
1/4 cup all-purpose flour

1 bayleaf

Instructions
Assemble ingredients and preheat oven to 325°F.

Chop stew meat into bite-size pieces.

In large skillet, over medium heat, brown meat in 1 – 1½ tbsp olive oil.

Place vegetables and meat in greased 2½-quart roaster or casserole.

In large bowl, combine sugar, herbs, garlic, tomato paste, beef consommé, Worcestershire Sauce, red wine, Guinness, and water. Whisk in flour until smooth. Pour over vegetables in roaster. Stir mixture to combine. Add bayleaf.

Cover roaster and place in pre-heated oven. Cook for approximately 2 hours or until vegetables are fork-tender when tested.

Serve with Irish Soda Bread, rolls, French Bread, or Garlic Bread.

Yield: Apx. 6 servings

My Island Bistro Kitchen's Irish Stew

A rich hearty stew made with beef and a variety of vegetables and flavoured with Guinness and red wine

Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 6
Author My Island Bistro Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 3/4 lb stew beef, chopped
  • 1 -1 1/2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup carrots, sliced
  • 2/3 cup parsnips, sliced or diced
  • 1/2 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 cup turnip, diced
  • 1 leek, sliced (white and light green parts only)
  • 3 cups potatoes, diced OR 1 lb mini potatoes (left whole, peelings on)
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp Herbs de Provence
  • 1 tsp garlic, minced
  • 1 5.5 oz can tomato paste
  • 1 10 oz can beef consommé
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1/2 cup red wine
  • 1/2 cup Guinness
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 bayleaf

Instructions

  1. Assemble ingredients and preheat oven to 325°F.
  2. Chop stew meat into bite-size pieces.
  3. In large skillet, over medium heat, brown meat in 1 - 1½ tbsp olive oil.
  4. Place vegetables and meat in greased 2½-quart roaster or casserole.
  5. In large bowl, combine sugar, herbs, garlic, tomato paste, beef consommé, Worcestershire Sauce, red wine, Guinness, and water. Whisk in flour until smooth. Pour over vegetables in roaster. Stir mixture to combine. Add bayleaf.
  6. Cover roaster and place in pre-heated oven. Cook for approximately 2 hours or until vegetables are fork-tender when tested.

Recipe Notes

Serve with Irish Soda Bread, rolls, French Bread, or Garlic Bread.

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Irish Stew
My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Irish Stew

Beef Pasta Casserole Recipe

Beef Pasta Casserole
Beef Pasta Casserole

I am a huge fan of batch cooking and preparing make-ahead meals to freeze for easy weeknight meal preparation.  I began batch cooking over 40 years ago when I moved away from my family home and began life on my own.  I went in search of cookbooks designed for cooking for one or two and didn’t find much on the market. What recipes I did find took ingredients that either weren’t available locally or the recipes called for sizes of ingredients that weren’t available in Canada.  I also soon discovered it really wasn’t much fun having to prepare a meal from scratch each night for one person.  That’s when I realized I didn’t need cookbooks with recipes sized down to one or two servings; I needed a freezer and I needed to batch cook make-ahead meals!

Beef Pasta Casserole
Beef Pasta Casserole

I currently have two freezers plus a deep freezer compartment in the bottom of the refrigerator and all are filled with make ahead-meals.  The entrées are a mix of very basic fare, like baked beans, pasta casseroles, and fish cakes, and more elaborate meals like fillings for vol-au-vents and crèpes for nights that call for something a little extra special.  Batch cooking means you still do the prep work but it is all done upfront at once and it eases the pressure of meal preparation on weeknights, especially on nights where one is late getting home from work.  So long as I have the makings for a salad in the fridge and some rolls, biscuits, or bread in the freezer, I can pull out a frozen entrée and have dinner on the table in 30 minutes or so. Clean-up is super easy, too, since there are no prep dishes or pots and pans to be washed, just the plate, glass, and utensils to be loaded into the dishwasher.

Beef Pasta Casserole
Beef Pasta Casserole

One of my standby casseroles is this beef pasta casserole.  It’s not hard to prepare and does not take any wild or weird ingredients. This makes a huge casserole so it’s great to take to potlucks or divide into meal-sized servings and frozen.  Use a large roaster or two 2-quart casseroles or, if you have a small household, divide the casserole up into small single serving casseroles or ramekins and freeze them.  I have a ton of ramekins as I find they are the perfect serving size for individual servings of casseroles.  I store these, unbaked, in large plastic freezer containers in the freezer.

Beef Pasta Casserole
Beef Pasta Casserole Ready for the Freezer

Easy steps make this casserole.  Brown the ground beef, drain, and set it aside.  Cook the pasta. Next, sauté the onion, garlic cloves, celery, green pepper, and mushrooms.  Then, combine all the liquid ingredients and canned tomatoes. Combine all the ingredients together along with some cheese and, voilà, that’s it!  Top the casserole with some extra cheese and bake in the oven for 25-30 minutes.   If freezing the casserole, freeze it unbaked and without the cheese topping which is best added at the time of baking.

Serve with your favorite green salad and biscuits, rolls, or bread.

Beef Pasta Casserole
Beef Pasta Casserole

Beef Pasta Casserole

Ingredients:

1½ lbs lean ground beef
1½ – 2 tbsp vegetable oil

1-2 tbsp vegetable oil
2/3 cup onion, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/3 cup celery, chopped
¼ cup green pepper, chopped
¾ cup sliced button mushrooms

1 – 284ml can tomato soup
1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
½ cup beef broth (homemade or commercial)
¼ cup tomato paste
1 tbsp maple syrup
2 tbsp basil pesto (homemade or commercial)
2 tsp Italian seasoning
¼ tsp ground ginger
1 – 398ml can diced tomatoes with juice
Salt and pepper, to taste

400g fusilli (regular or gluten-free), cooked according to package directions and drained (about 5 cups raw pasta)
2/3 cup shredded cheese of choice (e.g., cheddar, or a blend of cheeses)
2 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese

½ cup shredded cheese of choice for topping casserole

Method:

In large frypan, heat the vegetable oil and brown the meat over medium-low heat. Drain. Set aside.

Preheat oven to 350°F.

In large saucepan, heat second amount of vegetable oil over medium heat.  Sauté the onion, garlic, celery, and green pepper for approximately 2 minutes.  Add the mushrooms and sauté for 3-4 minutes.  Remove from heat and set aside.

In a large bowl or measuring cup, combine the tomato soup, Worcestershire sauce, beef broth, tomato paste, maple syrup, basil pesto, Italian seasoning, and ground ginger. Stir well.  Stir in canned tomatoes with juice. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

In large bowl or pot, combine the cooked pasta, meat, vegetables, liquid ingredients, 2/3 cup shredded cheese, and Parmesan cheese.  Stir gently to combine ingredients.  Transfer mixture to large greased roaster, two – 2-quart casseroles, or divide into individual serving-sized dishes such as ramekins.

Sprinkle casserole(s) with remaining ½ cup shredded cheese.  Bake in oven for 25-30 minutes to heat through.  Serve hot.  Casserole freezes well.

Yield:  12-14 servings

Beef Pasta Casserole

This tasty Beef Pasta Casserole is an easy-to-make weeknight casserole that combines ground beef, pasta, cheese, and a tomato-based sauce. Freezes well.

Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 12
Author My Island Bistro Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 lbs lean ground beef
  • 1 1/2 - 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1-2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2/3 cup onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/3 cup celery, chopped
  • 1/4 cup green pepper, chopped
  • 3/4 cup sliced button mushrooms
  • 1 - 284ml can tomato soup
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 cup beef broth
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp basil pesto
  • 2 tsp Italian seasoning
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 - 398ml can diced tomatoes with juice
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 400g fusilli (regular or gluten-free), cooked according to package directions and drained (about 5 cups raw pasta)
  • 2/3 cup shredded cheese of choice (e.g., cheddar, or a blend of cheeses)
  • 2 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup shredded cheese of choice for topping casserole

Instructions

  1. In large frypan, heat the vegetable oil and brown the meat over medium-low heat. Drain. Set aside.
  2. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  3. In large saucepan, heat second amount of vegetable oil over medium heat. Sauté the onion, garlic, celery, and green pepper for approximately 2 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sauté for 3-4 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.
  4. In a large bowl or measuring cup, combine the tomato soup, Worcestershire sauce, beef broth, tomato paste, maple syrup, basil pesto, Italian seasoning, and ground ginger. Stir well. Stir in canned tomatoes with juice. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  5. In large bowl or pot, combine the cooked pasta, meat, vegetables, liquid ingredients, 2/3 cup shredded cheese, and Parmesan cheese. Stir gently to combine ingredients. Transfer mixture to large greased roaster, two – 2-quart casseroles, or divide into individual serving-sized dishes such as ramekins.
  6. Sprinkle casserole(s) with remaining ½ cup shredded cheese. Bake in oven for 25-30 minutes to heat through. Serve hot. Casserole freezes well.

 

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Beef Pasta Casserole
Beef Pasta Casserole

Homemade Beef Stock Recipe and Tips (or is it Beef Broth?)

Beef Stock/Broth
Homemade Beef Stock/Broth

Beef stock and beef broth are terms often used interchangeably. However, there is actually a difference between the two.  True beef stock is made principally with bones and water and little to no seasoning.  It typically simmers for hours on the stove. Beef stock is nutrient dense, protein rich, and a good source of minerals and gelatin. Traditional beef broth, on the other hand, is usually made mainly with meat (though some bones may be included) and it often has additional flavorings (from vegetables, herbs, and spices) added to it. Beef broth typically simmers for less time than a true beef stock and is, therefore, a lighter product.

It seems the theory is that stock, made from the bones, is more pure and versatile than broth.  This is because the unseasoned stock can be used in more dishes in which seasoning can then be added, unique to each dish as it is made.  I actually like the soup, sauce, or casserole base (i.e., the stock/broth) to already have some seasoning in it to start with and I don’t experience any issues with my already-seasoned stock/broth in any recipe I am making.  I like the extra flavour boost the seasoned stock/broth gives to dishes. So, regardless what it is technically called, what follows is my recipe for beef stock/broth (or a combination or modification thereof).  Plan to make this on a day when you will be home for the day as this stock/broth will take 6-8 hours to simmer slowly.

Beef Stock/Broth
Beef Stock/Broth

A good stock/broth is a handy staple to have on hand in the cook’s kitchen (or freezer).  Of course, if it is made as a broth with some seasonings, it can be used as a drink and is particularly useful in situations where one must follow a clear liquid diet. But, the stock/broth can be used as the base for soups, sauces, braised dishes, and gravies and it can also be used when called for in a host of recipes and other dishes. With a homemade stock/broth, you know what is in it, there are no preservatives, and the amount of salt can be controlled.  I find that a lot of commercially-made stocks and broths are way too salty for my taste.

So, about 5 pounds of meaty bones with marrow from the local butcher will be needed for my recipe. By “meaty bones”, I am referring to bones that still have some meat on them. In fact, I like to include a couple of bones that have a substantial amount of meat on them as this, in my opinion, deepens the flavour of the stock/broth. Marrow is the fatty gelatin-like matter found in the cavity of large bones.  If you tell your butcher you are making stock/broth, he or she will know what product you are looking for – i.e., beef bones with marrow – ribs, shanks, knuckle bones, and so forth. I call my butcher a couple of days in advance to ensure that the butcher shop will have the right product and amount set aside for me and I always ask that the meaty bones be cut into 2” – 3” thick chunks so they are easier to handle in both the roasting and simmering processes. The photo below shows a sampling of the bones/meat I typically use in my stock/broth.

Beef Bones for Stock/Broth
Beef Bones for Stock/Broth

I like lots of deep flavor and color in my beef stock/broth. One way to get this is to roast the meaty bones.  The roasting process will caramelize the meaty bones and this will yield a rich brown-colored stock/broth.  Roast the bones at a high temperature (450°F) for about 30 minutes then brush some tomato paste over them and return them to the oven to roast for about 30 minutes longer.

Because I like lots of flavour in my stock/broth, I add some aromatic and flavourful vegetables – carrots, leek, parsnips, onion, celery, mushrooms, and a hefty dose of garlic. There is no need to peel the vegetables (except for the rutabaga that often has a wax coating).  Just make sure they are very well washed.  You want all the flavour and colour you can get from the vegetables, some of which is contained in the skins/peelings which will later be discarded anyway once the stock/broth is cooked and strained.

Celery is a big flavour agent in this stock/broth and that’s why, in addition to the three stalks of celery called for in the recipe, the celery leaves and the base of the three stalks are used to intensify the flavour. Any kind of mushrooms can be used in the stock/broth. Portobellos would be my first choice because of their earthy flavour and deep colour which will contribute to the colour of the stock/broth. I have, however, made great stock with the simple white button mushrooms which, of course, are more economical than Portobellos. Toss the vegetables with olive oil and add them to the roaster during the last 30 minutes of the roasting bones. It’s important to ensure these don’t burn or char so keep an eye on them and turn the veggies, if necessary, as they roast.

Once the bones and veggies are roasted, transfer them to a large stock pot. Don’t discard all those lovely brown bits and scrapings left in the roasting pan!  Simply add a small amount of water to the pan (or you can use a bit of red wine, if you wish), place the roaster over medium heat, and scrape those bits up and transfer them to the stockpot, too.  There is a lot of valuable flavour in those scrapings, too good to lose.

Fresh herbs can, of course, be used in this recipe but I have given amounts for dried herbs because we don’t all have access to quality fresh herbs year-round.  Even though this stock will be strained, I still like to gather up all the herbs and spices into a bouquet garni because it corrals them and keeps the stock cleaner.  To make the bouquet garni, cut an 8” square of double layer of cheesecloth, place the herbs and spices in the center, gather up the cheesecloth, and tie it with string.  Add this lovely aromatic sachet to the stock pot.  As the stock/broth simmers, it will be infused by the herbs and spices. Add the cold water, vinegar, bay leaves, and sea salt.  The vinegar will draw the gelatin, nutrients, and minerals from the bones through the slow simmering process.  Because only a small amount of vinegar is used, it will not leave a negative taste to the stock/broth.

Beef Stock/Broth
Beef Stock/Broth

Bring the ingredients almost, but not quite, to the boiling point over medium-high heat.  It’s critical that this stock NEVER boil – that will make it cloudy and the look you’re aiming for is a translucent liquid. Reduce the heat to a low simmer.  The temperature of the liquid should reach and stay around the 200°F point. A candy thermometer is useful to verify the heat from time to time as the stock/broth simmers. If the temperature of the liquid dips below 200°F, simply increase the heat just a bit to bring the temperature back up to the simmering point. If it exceeds 200°F, drop the heat back. It’s okay if you see tiny bubbles forming but they should not break the surface of the liquid. The other tip to a translucent stock/broth is not to stir it as it is simmering. This will stir everything up and can cause clouding to occur, resulting in a murky stock/broth. While a cloudy broth will not affect its flavour, a translucent broth is more eye appealing.

As the mixture is simmering, you will notice some fat from the bones rising to the surface. Periodically take a large spoon and skim this fat away and discard it.  Don’t cover the stockpot while the stock/broth is simmering as it is more difficult to keep the liquid at the simmering point if it is covered. Also, some reduction of the liquid is required in order to achieve desired flavour. If you find that too much of the stock/broth is evaporating too quickly, reduce the heat and add a bit more cold water to ensure all the ingredients are submerged in the liquid. However, be cautious about adding too much water as it will dilute the flavour of the stock/broth.

Beef Stock/Broth
Beef Stock/Broth

Once the stock/broth has simmered for 6-8 hours, remove it from the heat and strain it.  To do this, line a large colander with a double layer of damp cheesecloth. Place the colander over a clean stock pot and pour the stock/broth into the colander.  Discard the bones, vegetables, and bouquet garni.  Place the stockpot containing the strained stock/broth in a large sink filled with ice water to cool it quickly.  Skim off any further solidified fat as the stock/broth cools. If you are super particular about having a totally clear stock/broth, free of all impurities, I recommend straining it twice through a colander lined with damp cheesecloth. The stock/broth in the photos in this posting were strained once. Some tiny impurities are visible. They don’t bother me but a second straining of the stock/broth would remove them. Place the strained stock in the refrigerator to chill completely then remove any remaining solidified fat.  For more intense flavored stock/broth, it can be placed back on the stove at medium-low heat and reduced to one-half, yielding a stronger, more concentrated flavour but there will obviously be less quantity.

So, apart from the necessity to use the right ingredients in the stock/broth, the three big tips I have for making a clear, high quality stock/broth are:  1) Don’t boil it; 2) Don’t stir it; and 3) Don’t cover it while it simmers.  Basically, put the ingredients in a large stockpot, get the liquid to the simmering point and let it do its thing.

Beef Stock/Broth
Beef Stock/Broth

This stock/broth will keep in the refrigerator for up to three days or it can be frozen, at this point, in containers of desired size.  I usually freeze and label mine in different quantities based on what recipe I intend using it in. I will often freeze some stock/broth in ice cube containers and use them for flavoring dishes, like rice or steamed vegetables, where smaller amounts may be needed.  So, regardless whether the ingredients and method used in this recipe are technically a “broth” or a “stock”, I use this tasty product in any recipe calling for either beef stock or beef broth.

[Printable recipe follows at end of posting]

Homemade Beef Stock/Broth

 Ingredients:

5 lbs meaty beef bones with marrow (shank, ribs, knuckle bones)
Olive oil
1 – 5 oz/156ml can tomato paste

2 large carrots, unpeeled and halved, cut into 3” chunks
1 large leek, light and white parts only, halved
2 parsnips, unpeeled, cut into 2” chunks
1 large onion, unpeeled, halved
11 oz rutabaga, peeled, cut into ½” slices and halved
1 head garlic (containing apx. 9-10 cloves)
3 large celery ribs (with leaves and base of stalks included), cut into 3” chunks
6 oz mushrooms, halved

1 tbsp dried parsley
1½ tsp mixed peppercorns
1 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp dried rosemary
1 tsp dried basil
6 whole allspice
4 whole cloves

12 cups cold water
1½ tbsp cider vinegar
2 bay leaves
1½ tsp fine sea salt

Method:

Preheat oven to 450°F. Grease large roasting pan.  In large bowl, toss meaty bones with olive oil to lightly coat.  Place bones in roaster and roast for 30 minutes.

Place carrots, leek, parsnips, onion, rutabaga, garlic, celery, and mushrooms in a large bowl and add enough olive oil to lightly coat.

Remove bones from oven, turn, and brush them with tomato paste.  Add the olive-oil coated vegetables to the roasting pan and return the roaster to the oven.  Roast for another 30 minutes, turning the vegetables once or twice to ensure they do not burn.  Transfer roasted bones and vegetables to a large stockpot.  Add a small amount of water (or a bit of red wine) to roasting pan, place it over medium heat, and stir scrapings left from the roasting process.  Pour into stock pot with the bones and vegetables.

Using a small 8” square of double cheese cloth, gather the herbs and spices together in the center and tie up cheesecloth to make a bouquet garni.  Drop the sachet in to the stock pot. Add the cold water, vinegar, bay leaves, and sea salt.

Bring mixture to just below the boiling point over medium high heat. DO NOT BOIL. Reduce heat to a low simmer (liquid temperature should reach and remain around the 200°F point) and let stock simmer, uncovered, for 6-8 hours. If liquid evaporates too much and too quickly, reduce the heat and add a bit more water (e.g., 1 cup or so).  Periodically, skim the fat, as it forms, from the surface of the stock as it simmers. Do not stir mixture as it simmers as this may create a cloudy stock/broth.

Prepare a large colander with a double layer of damp cheesecloth.  Place colander over large clean stock pot and pour the stock/broth mixture into the colander to strain it.  Discard bones, vegetables, and bouquet garni.  Place stockpot containing the strained stock/broth in large sink filled with ice water to cool the stock quickly.  Remove and discard any solidified fat. Place strained stock in refrigerator to chill completely then remove any remaining solidified fat from the chilled stock/broth.

Use stock/broth immediately or store, covered, in refrigerator for up to 3 days.  Alternatively, pour stock/broth into containers of desired size and freeze for future use.

Yield:  Apx. 10 cups (depending on amount of evaporation and reduction that has occurred).

NOTE:  Strained stock/broth may be reheated over medium-low heat and reduced to one-half. This will yield a stronger flavored and more concentrated product but, naturally, there will be less quantity.

Straining the stock/broth twice through a cheesecloth-lined colander will yield a clearer broth, free of any impurities.

Homemade Beef Stock (or is it Beef Broth?)

Yield: Apx. 10 cups (depending on amount of evaporation and reduction that has occurred)

Roasted bones combined with long, slow simmering yield a deep, rich flavoured beef stock/broth that has a multitude of uses.

Ingredients

  • 5 lbs meaty beef bones with marrow (shank, ribs, knuckle bones)
  • Olive oil
  • 1 – 5 oz/156ml can tomato paste
  • 2 large carrots, unpeeled and halved, cut into 3” chunks
  • 1 large leek, light and white parts only, halved
  • 2 parsnips, unpeeled, cut into 2” chunks
  • 1 large onion, unpeeled, halved
  • 11 oz rutabaga, peeled, cut into ½” slices and halved
  • 1 head garlic (containing apx. 9-10 cloves)
  • 3 large celery ribs (with leaves and head of stalks included), cut into 3” chunks
  • 6 oz mushrooms, halved
  • 1 tbsp dried parsley
  • 1½ tsp mixed peppercorns
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 6 whole allspice
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 12 cups cold water
  • 1½ tbsp cider vinegar
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1½ tsp fine sea salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450°F. Grease large roasting pan. In large bowl, toss meaty bones with olive oil to lightly coat. Place bones in roaster and roast for 30 minutes.
  2. Place carrots, leek, parsnips, onion, rutabaga, garlic, celery, and mushrooms in a large bowl and add enough olive oil to lightly coat.
  3. Remove bones from oven, turn, and brush them with tomato paste. Add the olive-oil coated vegetables to the roasting pan and return the roaster to the oven. Roast for another 30 minutes, turning the vegetables once or twice to ensure they do not burn. Transfer roasted bones and vegetables to a large stockpot. Add a small amount of water (or a bit of red wine) to roasting pan, place it over medium heat, and stir scrapings left from the roasting process. Pour into stock pot with the bones and vegetables.
  4. Using a small 8” square of double cheese cloth, gather the herbs and spices together and tie up cheesecloth to make a bouquet garni. Drop the sachet in to the stock pot. Add the cold water, vinegar, bay leaves, and sea salt.
  5. Bring mixture to just below the boiling point over medium high heat. DO NOT BOIL. Reduce heat to a low simmer (liquid temperature should reach and remain around the 200°F point) and let stock simmer, uncovered, for 6-8 hours. If liquid evaporates too much and too quickly, reduce the heat and add a bit more water (e.g., 1 cup or so). Periodically, skim the fat, as it forms, from the surface of the stock as it simmers. Do not stir mixture as it simmers as this may create a cloudy stock/broth.
  6. Prepare a large colander with a double layer of damp cheesecloth. Place colander over large clean stock pot and pour the stock/broth mixture into the colander to strain it. Discard bones, vegetables, and bouquet garni. Place stockpot containing the strained stock/broth in large sink filled with ice water to cool the stock quickly. Remove and discard any solidified fat. Place strained stock in refrigerator to chill completely then remove any remaining solidified fat from the chilled stock/broth.
  7. Use stock/broth immediately or store, covered, in refrigerator for up to 3 days. Alternatively, pour stock/broth into containers of desired size and freeze for future use.

Notes

Strained stock/broth may be reheated over medium-low heat and reduced to one-half. This will yield a stronger flavored and more concentrated product but, naturally, there will be less quantity.

Straining the stock/broth twice through cheesecloth-lined colanders will yield a clearer broth, free of any impurities.

Be sure to read the accompanying blog post to this recipe as it contains additional information and tips on making beef stock/broth.

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Beef Broth

Rethink Beef Global Recipe Swap Campaign: Moussaka

Moussaka
Moussaka

I have been invited by www.thinkbeef.ca to participate, as one of ten food bloggers from across Canada, in the Rethink Beef Global Recipe Swap Campaign to promote recipes using ground beef. Each blogger was asked to develop a recipe (using ground beef) that is inspired by his or her cultural background or a culinary adventure experienced. Each blogger was paired with another and the two exchanged their own recipe for the other to try. This posting involves showcasing my own recipe as well as a recipe from my swap partner, Jason Lee, who writes the blog, “Shut Up and Eat”.

Moussaka
Moussaka

I frequently use ground beef in recipes and am never at a loss to come up with meal ideas to use this versatile meat. The recipe I have chosen is Moussaka. This is a one-dish meal typically characterized by ground meat, eggplant, and tomato sauce with a white sauce on top. So, I will begin with a discussion on why I chose Moussaka to feature ground beef, followed by some hints and tips on making this Greek-inspired dish, and will end with my experience cooking my recipe swap partner’s Beef and Coriander Dumplings inspired by his Chinese heritage. This posting has two recipes from two different cultures but both use ground beef as the main ingredient.

A Greek Taverna in Kerkira, Corfu, Greece
A Greek Taverna in Kerkira, Corfu, Greece

The recipe for Moussaka is inspired by a recent trip to the Mediterranean area that included a re-visit to parts of Greece. I have always been a fan of typical Mediterranean dishes and, when I would stop and look at menus of Greek tavernas, like the one in the photo above in Kerkira, Corfu, I’d inevitably see Moussaka as one of the offerings. While I was unable to conclusively determine the exact origins of Moussaka, it is a dish that is commonly associated with Greece. It had been a long time since I had Moussaka and my visits to several Greek Islands re-ignited my interest in this tasty dish.

Taverna in Kerkira, Corfu, Greece
Taverna in Kerkira, Corfu, Greece

I was first introduced to Moussaka in the early 1980s when I found myself working not far from the restaurant of the Dundee Arms Inn  in Charlottetown, PEI. Their restaurant was considered one of the best in town with an upscale menu, and my workplace had a standing Friday noon reservation as, otherwise, it would have been impossible to get a table. The popular restaurant had an extensive lunch menu that included Moussaka.  This became my standard Friday noontime order. The traditional Moussaka contains eggplant as a key ingredient; however, I never did acquire a taste for eggplant but I sure did enjoy the rest of this yummy dish that was served, piping hot, in au-gratin dishes. I’d simply move the eggplant to the side and enjoy the meat and tomato sauce with its traditional béchamel topping. After all these years, when I think of Moussaka, I can still recall the wonderful flavor of the dish at The Dundee.

So, when I returned home from Europe in the fall, I decided I would develop a Moussaka recipe minus the eggplant, instead substituting potatoes as the base. This is quite apropos given I am from Prince Edward Island, home of great potato production. There are many variations of Moussaka, depending on the region in which it is being made, and many different combinations of meat that can be used. Mine keeps it simple by using lean ground beef. Needless to say, I was thrilled when I was invited to participate in the Rethink Beef Global Recipe Swap Campaign because I knew that Moussaka would be the recipe I would use in which to feature ground beef! And, it was the catalyst for me to get busy and develop the recipe instead of leaving it on my “To Do At Some Point” list.

Moussaka
Moussaka

Moussaka is not difficult to make so long as it is approached in a methodical and organized manner. That said, this is not a dish I would attempt for dinner on a weeknight after having arrived home from work at 5pm.  This is a great weekend dish. Serve it with rustic bread or rolls or biscuits alongside a green salad. If desired, pair with a red wine such as a Chianti Classico.

Moussaka
Moussaka

My version of Moussaka does not take any out-of-the-ordinary ingredients.  However, it does require planning, organization, and some time.  I don’t find it’s any more complicated or time-consuming than making lasagna.  There are four layers to my Moussaka – the potato base covered by the breadcrumb and Parmesan cheese mixture, followed by the meat sauce, and topped with a cheesy white sauce. As always, I recommend a thorough reading of the recipe before beginning the cooking process to make sure you have all the ingredients and understand the preparation method.

Moussaka
Moussaka

Here are my hints and tips for successfully making Moussaka:

  • Assemble and prepare cooking and food prep equipment (e.g., grater, whisk, measuring spoons, skillet, baking pan, baking sheet, etc.)
  • A deep 9” pan is best for baking this Moussaka. I used an 8” pan and it was full to the brim. I placed the pan on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet in case the Moussaka boiled out.  It didn’t, fortunately, but a deep 9” pan would give a little bit extra leeway.
  • Assemble and prepare all ingredients before beginning – chop the onion and celery and mince the garlic, grate the cheese, process the bread into crumbs, bring the eggs to room temperature, etc.
  • Before beginning, measure out all the ingredients and separate and group them according to the meat sauce, white sauce, etc. This will make the process go more quickly and efficiently.
  • Start the meat sauce first as it will need 25-30 minutes to simmer during which time work can be done on preparing the potatoes and white sauce. While the simmering process will allow the liquid content in the meat sauce to reduce, there is a fine line in how much liquid to evaporate out of the meat sauce. Removing too much will make the meat filling too dry but leaving too much will make it too runny when the Moussaka is cut.  A good gauge is to run a heat-proof rubber spatula through the meat sauce to make a track. If the sauce does not immediately fill the track back in, it’s done!
  • Choose a grind of beef that has reduced fat in it. I find lean ground beef has just the right meat/fat content for this recipe.
  • Make sure the oven is preheated to 425°F as soon as the meat sauce is starting to simmer so the oven is ready to roast the potatoes.
  • Choose a dry variety of potato, such as Russets, for this recipe. Wetter varieties of potatoes will have too much moisture in them and they may go “mushy” and not hold their shape in the Moussaka base.
  • Slice the potatoes about ¼” thick (or use a mandolin) and start them roasting once the meat sauce has been simmering for about 10 minutes. About ¼” thickness is good for the potato slices. Any thinner and they are likely to burn in the roasting process; any thicker and they provide too much of a starch taste in the Moussaka. Only roast the potatoes until they are just barely fork tender – overcooking will turn them to mush and they need to hold together in this dish as they form the base.
  • The grind for the breadcrumbs should not be as fine as you’d find in a box of commercial breadcrumbs. They should be slightly coarser. I use my food processor to grind breadcrumbs from crusts. I keep a ready supply of these on hand in my freezer for casseroles and for making poultry stuffing. This thin layer of breadcrumbs mixed with Parmesan cheese adds another layer of flavor to the Moussaka and also helps to absorb any excess moisture there might be in the potatoes.
  • The amount of garlic and spices to use is always very subjective and can vary greatly according to taste preferences. As with all recipes, I recommend following the recipe-prescribed amounts the first time the recipe is made, then altering the amounts, if necessary, the next time the dish is made. The amount of spices and garlic used in this recipe is moderate, meaning the meat sauce is not overly spicy.
  • About 10 minutes before the meat sauce is due to be done, start the white sauce. The goal is that the meat sauce, roasted potatoes and white sauce should all be ready about the same time so that the Moussaka can be assembled efficiently.
  • After the Moussaka has finished baking, allow it to sit for 20-30 minutes as this will allow it to set and firm up, making it easier to cut. Cutting it as soon as it comes out of the oven may cause the layers to separate, meaning the Moussaka won’t stay intact and stand on its own when plated.  The Moussaka should stay intact with each layer visible when it is cut.
Moussaka
Moussaka

[Printable recipe follows at end of posting]

My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Moussaka Recipe

Ingredients:

Meat Sauce:
1 tbsp olive oil
1 lb lean ground beef

1½ tbsp olive oil
¾ cup onion, chopped
1/3 cup celery, chopped fine
3 cloves garlic, minced
14 oz canned crushed tomatoes
¼ cup tomato paste
1/3 cup red wine
1/3 cup beef broth
1 bay leaf
1¼ tsp dried oregano
1¼ tsp dried basil
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice
1/8 tsp cinnamon
½ tbsp dried parsley
1 tbsp brown sugar
Salt and pepper, to taste

Roasted Potato Layer:
2¼ lb russet potatoes, peeled and sliced into about ¼” thick slices
Olive oil
Salt and Pepper

White Sauce:
2½ tbsp butter
3 tbsp flour
1 2/3 cups warm milk
2 extra-large egg yolks (room temperature), slightly beaten
Pinch nutmeg
¼ tsp salt
Pinch pepper
2/3 cup grated Gouda cheese

Breadcrumb Layer:
¾ cup fine bread crumbs
2 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese

Topping:

2 tbsp finely grated Parmesan cheese
1/8 tsp nutmeg

Method:

Meat Sauce:  Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in large skillet over medium-high heat.  Add beef and scramble fry until no longer pink, about 5 minutes.  Transfer meat to wire sieve positioned over bowl to drain off excess liquid. Set meat aside.

Return skillet to heat and add 1½ tbsp olive oil over medium heat.  Add onions and celery.  Cook until vegetables are softened, about 5 minutes, stirring constantly to prevent burning. Add the minced garlic and cook for an additional 30-60 seconds while stirring mixture.

Add the drained ground beef, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, red wine, beef broth, bay leaf, spices, brown sugar, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to simmer and cook, uncovered, for about 20-25 minutes, or until most (but not all) of the liquid has evaporated, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and discard bay leaf.

Roast Potatoes: While meat sauce is simmering, heat the oven to 425°F.  Place potato slices in large bowl and drizzle very lightly with olive oil, salt, and pepper.  Toss potatoes to coat in oil. Place the sliced potatoes, single layer, on a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet. Roast for about 12-15 minutes, or just until potatoes are barely fork tender. Remove potatoes from oven and reduce heat to 375°F for baking Moussaka.

White Sauce:  In medium-sized saucepan over medium heat, melt butter.  Whisk in the flour.  Cook, whisking constantly for about 1 minute.  Slowly whisk in the warm milk.  Bring mixture just to the boiling point.  Remove approximately ¼ cup of the hot liquid and whisk into the slightly beaten egg yolks to temper them so they don’t curdle.  Whisk the eggs into saucepan mixture.  Add nutmeg, salt, and pepper.  Cook over medium-low heat until mixture thickens and coats the back of a spoon, about 1 minute.  Stir in the Gouda cheese until melted. Mixture should be of spreading consistency when sufficiently thickened.

Breadcrumb Layer:  In small bowl, mix breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese together.

Assembly:    Grease deep 9” baking pan.  Arrange half the potato slices in the bottom of the baking pan, overlapping the potatoes slightly.  Sprinkle one-half the breadcrumb-Parmesan cheese mixture over the potatoes.  Evenly spread one-half the meat sauce over the potatoes and breadcrumbs.  Place a layer of the remaining potato slices, followed by the rest of the breadcrumbs, and then the remaining meat sauce.  Evenly spread the white sauce over the entire mixture.  Sprinkle with 1½ tbsp finely grated Parmesan cheese and 1/8 tsp nutmeg.

Place baking pan on a rimmed baking sheet lined with tin foil to catch any spills should casserole bubble out.  Bake for about 45 minutes or until bubbly and the top lightly browned.  Remove from oven and let stand for 20-30 minutes before cutting and serving. Serve with a green salad and rustic bread, rolls, or biscuits.

Yield:  Apx. 6-8 servings


And, Now, My Swap Partner’s Recipe ….

My recipe swap partner, Jason, chose to create a Beef and Coriander Dumplings recipe to feature ground beef.  Jason says, being Chinese, dumplings have always been a part of his life for as long as he can remember. Making dumplings with his mother and grandmothers is one of his fondest memories. A culinary course instructor specializing in Chinese cuisine, Jason is always looking for different dumpling recipes. He tells me that this particular recipe was inspired by a chili oil he was experimenting with for another recipe.

I was excited to try Jason’s recipe because I had never had filled dumplings and I love Chinese food! I was a little concerned at first that I might have difficulty finding dumpling wrappers and chili oil in PEI; however, the Island has a growing Asian population and, by participating in this initiative, I discovered Charlottetown, in fact, has a number of small global and Asian food specialty stores. I had no problem sourcing the ingredients locally for this recipe. I found the recipe easy to make and tasty. I did some online research into how to fold the dumplings and I experienced no difficulty in accomplishing the task. Jason’s method to cook the dumplings is to boil them and they cooked quite quickly, floating to the top of the water with the dumpling wrappers becoming somewhat translucent to signify they were done, all in the span of about 5 minutes.

It’s fun to try others’ recipes and, through this initiative, I discovered another Asian-inspired dish to add to the menu of my next Chinese-themed dinner.

Here is Jason Lee’s Beef and Coriander Dumplings recipe:

Jason Lee's Beef and Coriander Dumplings, served with spicy chili oil
Jason Lee’s Beef and Coriander Dumplings, served with spicy chili oil

Beef and Coriander Dumplings

(Served with spicy chili oil)

 
1 package dumpling wrappers (approx. 35)

 Filling:
1 pound ground beef
1/2 cup finely chopped green onion
3/4 cup chopped coriander
2 tablespoons minced ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon white  pepper
1 teaspoon Sichuan peppercorns, toasted and ground
3 tablespoon water

Garnish:
3 tablespoon crushed peanuts
3 tablespoon chopped coriander
3 tablespoon chili oil
1 teaspoon ground Szechuan peppercorn

Procedure:

  1. Add all filling ingredients into a large clean bowl and thoroughly mix until everything is combined.
  2. Spoon about 1 tablespoon of filling into wrapped and fold/pleat into dumpling.
  3. Boil dumplings in a large pot in batches – about 10 at a time – for 5 minutes. Drain and transfer to serving bowls.
  4. Spoon chili oil over dumplings, sprinkle peanuts, coriander and ground Szechuan peppercorn.

Be sure to visit Jason’s blog, Shut Up and Eat, to read his posting about his recipe.


For more great ground beef-inspired recipes, visit www.thinkbeef.ca

Disclosure: This post has been sponsored by thinkbeef.ca and I was compensated monetarily for its content and with groceries to make both recipes.

Rethink Beef Global Recipe Swap Campaign: Moussaka

Yield: Apx. 6-8 servings

A Greek-inspired dish featuring layers of ground beef, potatoes, and a tomato sauce all covered in a delectable white sauce topping

Ingredients

  • Meat Sauce:
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 lb lean ground beef
  • 1½ tbsp olive oil
  • ¾ cup onion, chopped
  • 1/3 cup celery, chopped fine
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 14 oz canned crushed tomatoes
  • ¼ cup tomato paste
  • 1/3 cup red wine
  • 1/3 cup beef broth
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1¼ tsp dried oregano
  • 1¼ tsp dried basil
  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp allspice
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tbsp dried parsley
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Roasted Potato Layer
  • 2¼ lb russet potatoes, peeled and sliced into about ¼” thick slices
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and Pepper
  • White Sauce:
  • 2½ tbsp butter
  • 3 tbsp flour
  • 1 2/3 cups warm milk
  • 2 extra-large egg yolks (room temperature), slightly beaten
  • Pinch nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • Pinch pepper
  • 2/3 cup grated Gouda cheese
  • Breadcrumb Layer:
  • ¾ cup fine bread crumbs
  • 2 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese
  • Topping:
  • 2 tbsp finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg

Instructions

  1. Meat Sauce: Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add beef and scramble fry until no longer pink, about 5 minutes. Transfer meat to wire sieve positioned over bowl to drain off excess liquid. Set meat aside.
  2. Return skillet to heat and add 1½ tbsp olive oil over medium heat. Add onions and celery. Cook until vegetables are softened, about 5 minutes, stirring constantly to prevent burning. Add the minced garlic and cook for an additional 30-60 seconds while stirring mixture.
  3. Add the drained ground beef, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, red wine, beef broth, bay leaf, spices, brown sugar, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to simmer and cook, uncovered, for about 20-25 minutes, or until most (but not all) of the liquid has evaporated, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and discard bay leaf.
  4. Roast Potatoes: While meat sauce is simmering, heat the oven to 425°F. Place potato slices in large bowl and drizzle very lightly with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Toss potatoes to coat in oil. Place the sliced potatoes, single layer, on a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet. Roast for about 12-15 minutes, or just until potatoes are barely fork tender. Remove potatoes from oven and reduce heat to 375°F for baking Moussaka.
  5. White Sauce: In medium-sized saucepan over medium heat, melt butter. Whisk in the flour. Cook, whisking constantly for about 1 minute. Slowly whisk in the warm milk. Bring mixture just to the boiling point. Remove approximately ¼ cup of the hot liquid and whisk into the slightly beaten egg yolks to temper them so they don’t curdle. Whisk the eggs into saucepan mixture. Add nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Cook over medium-low heat until mixture thickens and coats the back of a spoon, about 1 minute. Stir in the Gouda cheese until melted. Mixture should be of spreading consistency when sufficiently thickened.
  6. Breadcrumb Layer:
  7. In small bowl, mix breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese together.
  8. Assembly: Grease deep 9” baking pan. Arrange half the potato slices in the bottom of the baking pan, overlapping the potatoes slightly. Sprinkle one-half the breadcrumb-Parmesan cheese mixture over the potatoes. Evenly spread one-half the meat sauce over the potatoes and breadcrumbs. Place a layer of the remaining potato slices, followed by the rest of the breadcrumbs, and then the remaining meat sauce. Evenly spread the white sauce over the entire mixture. Sprinkle with 1½ tbsp finely grated Parmesan cheese and 1/8 tsp nutmeg.
  9. Place baking pan on a rimmed baking sheet lined with tin foil to catch any spills should casserole bubble out. Bake for about 45 minutes or until bubbly and the top lightly browned. Remove from oven and let stand for 20-30 minutes before cutting and serving. Serve with a green salad and rustic bread, rolls, or biscuits.

Notes

NOTE: Please read entire post which is filled with tips and hints on making Moussaka which are not mentioned in the recipe itself.

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#RethinkBeef Global Recipe Swap Campaign - Moussaka #sponsored
#RethinkBeef Global Recipe Swap Campaign – Moussaka #sponsored

The Bistro’s Beef Pot Pie

Beef Pot Pie
Beef Pot Pie

I am a huge fan of cooking with the intent of having leftovers for several meals.  It’s great to have cold leftover turkey, ham, or roast beef but, after a couple of days, well, it can get a little monotonous.  I don’t like to throw out food so the alternative is to find other creative ways to use the leftovers and stretch the food budget.  Sometimes, as in the case of a large family, perhaps the leftovers don’t span far enough unless they are used in a way that extends them.

So, whether it’s a case of having leftover meat you’re tired of or not having enough left to plate as straight cold meat slices to make another meal, my recipe for Beef Pot Pie will be the answer for leftover roast beef.  Just make sure you make an extra 1 1/3 cups of gravy when preparing that roast beef dinner so you will have enough gravy to make this recipe.

Beef Pot Pie
Beef Pot Pie

Beef Pot Pie is a tasty meal-in-a-dish — the meat, veggies, and gravy are all encased under a pastry topping.  It takes very little beef (only about 1 cup, cubed) to make a meal for four with this recipe.  It’s a great way to stretch a small amount of meat and extend the food budget.

The potatoes, turnip, and carrots are pre-cooked to fork-tender state in the same pot — bonus, only one pot to wash!  The sauce with the gravy is quite simple to make with only a few additions of common ingredients to add extra flavor.  Add some cooked frozen peas and corn to add extra veggies and color.  Top with your favorite pastry recipe and you’re done! And, your house will smell fabulous as this cooks, beckoning the family to the dinner table!

Beef Pot Pie
Beef Pot Pie

Sometimes, if I’ve had the leftover meat on the dinner table for a couple of days, I’m tired of it and don’t want to see it on the table again right away in any form! That’s when I make up this recipe and freeze it for later use and to have ready for meals on busy week nights.  I have had success freezing this dish, unbaked, in an airtight container.  I bake it from frozen state but add extra baking time (at least 20 minutes more). If the pastry starts to brown too much during the baking, simply loosely tent the casserole dish(es) with tin foil.

[Printable recipe follows at end of post]

Beef Pot Pie

Ingredients:

1/3 cup turnip, peeled and diced into ¼” cubes
1/3 cup carrots, peeled and diced into ¼” cubes
1¼ cups potatoes, peeled and diced into ½” cubes
1-2 tbsp vegetable oil
2/3 cup onion, finely diced
2 oz small button mushrooms, halved
1 cup leftover cooked roast beef, cubed into bite-size pieces
1 1/3 cups leftover beef gravy
2 tbsp tomato paste
¼ tsp Worcestershire sauce
2 tbsp red wine
½ tsp garlic salt
¼ tsp summer savory
Salt and pepper to taste
1/3 cup frozen peas, cooked
1/3 cup frozen corn, cooked
1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley

Pastry for single-crust pie

Method:

Preheat oven to 400°F.

In medium-sized saucepan, over medium-low heat, boil the turnip and carrots in salted water for about 5-6 minutes, then add the potatoes.  Cook all three vegetables for about 10 minutes or so or until just fork tender.  Drain well.

While the vegetables are cooking, heat oil in large skillet over medium heat.  Sauté the onions until limp and transparent.  Add the mushrooms and sauté for 2 minutes.  Add the cubed beef and stir fry for 1-2 minutes.  Add the gravy, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, red wine, garlic salt, summer savory, salt and pepper.  Reduce heat and simmer for 2-3 minutes. Meanwhile, microwave the peas and corn for about 1½ minutes on high power. Drain any excess liquid.

Add the meat mixture to the cooked vegetables (turnip, carrots, and potatoes) and add the drained peas, corn, and the fresh parsley.  Stir with large mixing spoon to combine all ingredients.

Grease a 5-6 cup casserole or four 1-cup ramekins.  Pour mixture into casserole or evenly divide between the 4 ramekins.

Roll pastry to desired thickness. Cut to size that will completely cover mixture in casserole dish or ramekins.  Cut slits in the pastry to allow steam to escape during baking. Alternatively, prepare lattice top from the pastry to cover meat sauce in each dish.

Place baking dish, or ramekins, on foil-lined rimmed baking sheet to catch any spillovers that might occur. Transfer to pre-heated oven.  Bake for 20-25 minutes or until mixture is bubbly and pastry lightly tanned.  Serve with crusty rolls, rustic bread, or biscuits.

Yield:  4 servings.

Beef Pot Pie

Yield: 4 servings

Leftover roast beef forms the basis for this delicious Beef Pot Pie meal-in-a-dish smothered with a rich sauce and encased in a tender pie pastry topping.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup turnip, peeled and diced into ¼” cubes
  • 1/3 cup carrots, peeled and diced into ¼” cubes
  • 1¼ cups potatoes, peeled and diced into ½” cubes
  • 1-2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2/3 cup onion, finely diced
  • 2 oz small button mushrooms, halved
  • 1 cup leftover cooked roast beef, cubed into bite-size pieces
  • 1 1/3 cups leftover beef gravy
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • ¼ tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbsp red wine
  • ½ tsp garlic salt
  • ¼ tsp summer savory
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/3 cup frozen peas, cooked
  • 1/3 cup frozen corn, cooked
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • Pastry for single-crust pie

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. In medium-sized saucepan, over medium-low heat, boil the turnip and carrots in salted water for about 5-6 minutes, then add the potatoes. Cook all three vegetables for about 10 minutes or so or until just fork tender. Drain well.
  3. While the vegetables are cooking, heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Sauté the onions until limp and transparent. Add the mushrooms and sauté for 2 minutes. Add the cubed beef and stir fry for 1-2 minutes. Add the gravy, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, red wine, garlic salt, summer savory, salt and pepper. Reduce heat and simmer for 2-3 minutes. Meanwhile, microwave the peas and corn for about 1½ minutes on high power. Drain any excess liquid.
  4. Add the meat mixture to the cooked vegetables (turnip, carrots, and potatoes) and add the drained peas, corn, and fresh parsley. Stir with large mixing spoon to combine all ingredients.
  5. Grease a 5-6 cup casserole or four 1-cup ramekins. Pour mixture into casserole or evenly divide between the 4 ramekins.
  6. Roll pastry to desired thickness. Cut to size that will completely cover mixture in casserole dish or ramekins. Cut slits in the pastry to allow steam to escape during baking. Alternatively, prepare lattice top from the pastry to cover meat sauce in each dish.
  7. Place baking dish, or ramekins, on foil-lined rimmed baking sheet to catch any spillovers that might occur. Transfer to pre-heated oven. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until mixture is bubbly and pastry lightly tanned. Serve with crusty rolls, rustic bread, or biscuits.
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Beef Pot Pie
Beef Pot Pie

 

Beef Pot Pie
Beef Pot Pie