Tag Archives: Plum Pudding

Five PEI Foodies Talk About Their Christmas Food Traditions

Herb-Basted Roast Turkey
Herb-Basted Roast Turkey

Food plays a vital role in Christmas celebrations here in Prince Edward Island. I recently chatted with five Islanders who, in one way or another, have strong food connections. Read on to find out what foods these foodies most associate with Christmas and what foods, if they didn’t have them, it just would not be Christmas for them.

(With the exception of Premier Wade MacLauchlan’s Seafood Pie,   all photos in this posting are from the food blogger’s own stock collection and are not of contributors’ specific recipes mentioned in this article.)

Wade MacLauchlan, Premier of Prince Edward Island

Food factors heavily into Premier Wade MacLauchlan’s Christmas festivities.  The premier, a great cook himself, launches into seafood pie production in mid-December.  He produces some 20 seafood pies filled with mussels, lobster, bar clams, scallops, and some fin fish like salmon, trout, or haddock.

Premier Wade MacLaughlan's Seafood Pie
Premier Wade MacLauchlan’s Seafood Pie

Premier MacLauchlan uses grated potatoes that have been cooked in seafood stock to make a heavy starchy paste which eliminates the need for flour as a thickener for the pie filling.  The ingredients are combined and placed inside a double-crusted pastry and baked.

Premier Wade MacLauchlan's Seafood Pie
Premier Wade MacLauchlan’s Seafood Pie

When asked what he does with all the pies, he tells me he gives them away as gifts. And, for those who aren’t seafood lovers, he makes tourtière and says he usually makes between 6 and 10 of those each December.

Food also plays a part in a Solstice Sunrise Party that the premier has been hosting at his home for almost two decades.  Held annually on the day of the winter solstice, the premier says he simply couldn’t stop it now even if he wanted to because the regulars would just show up anyway! Rising early to make 3-4 dozen muffins and to brew a couple of urns of coffee, the premier opens his doors at 7:30am and people start arriving to watch the sunrise together around 8:00am. It’s not uncommon for 75-80 people to attend. With a commanding view to the east and to the south out over Stanhope Bay, it’s a time for family, friends, and neighbours to visit and re-connect. Everyone brings food to contribute to the potluck event which is set up buffet style.

Christmas Day is spent with immediate family and, on Boxing Day, the larger extended MacLauchlan family gather at the premier’s home for a potluck brunch.

The premier has kindly shared his recipe for his Seafood Pie which is printed here with Wade MacLauchlan’s permission.  The premier says, although the recipe yield is for 20 pies, the recipe is easily scalable.

Wade MacLauchlan's Seafood Pie Recipe
Premier Wade MacLauchlan's Seafood Pie
Premier Wade MacLauchlan’s Seafood Pie

Peter Bevan-Baker, Leader of the Green Party of Prince Edward Island

Communal family cooking has always played a significant part in Peter Bevan-Baker’s life starting when he was a lad growing up in Fortrose, just north of Inverness, in the Highlands of Scotland. The family would all prepare the Christmas dinner together, chopping vegetables and singing Christmas carols.

Member of the Legislature and Leader of the Green Party of PEI, Peter’s first and foremost memory of a food enjoyed at Christmas time is his late father’s vol-au-vent made with leftover turkey from Christmas dinner and served with Sauce Robert, a brown mustard sauce. Sometimes, the vol-au-vents would be served as nibbles but other times as the main for a meal when they would be served with “tatties and neeps”, the Scottish names for potatoes and turnips, respectively.

Plum Pudding
Plum Pudding

When asked what Christmas dinner dessert consisted of, Peter says it was always Christmas Pudding which he did not like at all!  However, he says the arrival of the pudding at the dinner table was quite an elaborate ceremony. Everyone stood up and literally lifted the table off the floor to meet the pudding – it was a true salute to the Christmas pudding! Of course, some alcohol would be heated, poured over the pudding, and the pudding set aflame. Peter claims watching the pudding burn was the best part since he had no liking for the pudding! His father made a brandy butter to serve with the pudding. Peter says another great memory he has of Christmas as a young boy in the Scottish Highlands was visiting a rich family who lived in the area and who served Coca Cola at Christmas which was very special since it was not something he had at home.

Peter’s father was a great cook and modeled to his children that it was okay for men to be in the kitchen cooking. Today, Peter and his wife have four adult children (two of whom are chefs) and cooking remains very much a family event. Vol-au-vents will make an appearance over the holidays in keeping with his long-standing family tradition. While the family usually has a turkey dinner for Christmas, Peter says it will usually be with a contemporary twist of some sort that may include some dishes from other cultures.

Bill Martin, Mayor of Summerside and Owner of the Water Street Bakery

Mayor of the City of Summerside, Bill Martin has very fond memories of waking up on Christmas morning to the scent of meat pies baking.  His mother, a Scottish war bride, had an absolute Christmas morning tradition and that involved homemade meat pies.  The family enjoyed the meat pies, complete with homemade mustard pickles, after opening presents on Christmas morning.  Mayor Martin continues that tradition today. He and his family enjoy Christmas breakfast of bacon, eggs, homefries, and toast along with the meat pie and mustard pickles.  To this tradition, they have also added the Acadian dish, Rapure, a grated potato casserole.

Acadian Rapure
Acadian Rapure

Mayor Martin and his wife have run the Water Street Bakery for the past 29 years. They make meat pies year-round now and, in December alone, they will make more than 2000 meat pies which are made with pork, chicken, turkey, potato, onion, and spices, all covered in a biscuit dough crust.  These pies are in such demand during the Christmas period that the bakery has rented additional freezer space. In fact, on the first Saturday in December, they made 200 meat pies and sold 100 of them the same day. As a bakery owner, the other two most popular items that Martin says never go out of style are the chocolate-covered peanut butter balls and the cherry balls, both of which are available at the bakery only at Christmas which makes them more special treats.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Balls
Chocolate Peanut Butter Balls

Irwin MacKinnon, Executive Chef, Papa Joe’s Restaurant and PEI Chef of the Year 2017

Long-time executive chef at Charlottetown’s Papa Joe’s Restaurant and recently-named PEI Chef of the Year 2017, Chef Irwin MacKinnon says it would not be Christmas in his household without the “Jimmy Jams”.  These delightful cookies have been made by ancestors on his mother’s side for years. Today, his mom is the principle baker of these Christmas treats that his children look forward to each Christmas.  As MacKinnon describes them, Jimmy-Jams are two round shortbread cookies, about 1½“ – 2” in diameter, sandwiched together with plain white icing.  Each sandwiched cookie is iced again on top and then decorated with rainbow-colored sprinkles.

Everyone has his or her own version of the stuffing for the turkey and Chef MacKinnon discovered how important that tradition is when he and his wife married 25 years ago.  On his side of the family, they make what he calls “Grammie’s Stuffing” which is bread-based and the ingredients are bound together by mashed potato and lots of butter and seasoned with onion, summer savory, and salt and pepper.  A bit of brown sugar is added just to give a sweet tone.  On his wife’s side of the family, they make the stuffing (dressing) completely opposite and Chef Irwin classes it as a potato stuffing made with mashed potatoes, onion cooked in butter, and seasoned with summer savory.  This is baked in the oven and there is no bread in this version.  If you are an Islander, you’ll get and appreciate the significance of family recipes for the turkey stuffing/dressing!

Roast Turkey
Roast Turkey

So, whose stuffing recipe will be on the Christmas table in the MacKinnon household this year? You guessed it – Irwin will be making his grammie’s stuffing recipe to go along with the fresh turkey from Larkin Brothers in New Glasgow. To this, he’ll include a wide variety of veggies that include potatoes, turnip, carrots, squash, and brussel sprouts.

For dessert, Chef Irwin’s mother-in-law’s plum pudding will grace the table complemented by Irwin’s rich brown sugar sauce made from a rue of butter and flour with caramelized brown sugar added.  Chef Irwin says a slice of pudding topped with ice cream and a good drizzle of a glossy brown sugar sauce is the ultimate Christmas dinner dessert.

Since he cooks everyday for a living, I asked Chef Irwin if he lets someone else cook the Christmas dinner but he says it’s him that spearheads the dinner at home and one of his greatest joys is to cook for his own family.  Other members of the family pitch in and bring contributions to the dinner as the family melds their different traditions from their blended families.

Glenda Burt, Chef, and former owner of The Home Place Restaurant in Kensington, PEI

For Chef Glenda Burt, the highlight of the Christmas dinner is the plum pudding and warm sauce.  She says that, even though you might be “stuffed to the gills” from the main meal, there is always room for plum pudding!  Glenda makes a rich toffee sauce to serve with her plum pudding, a sauce made with brown sugar, whipping cream, butter, and vanilla.

Plum Pudding
Plum Pudding

Glenda grew up in the family that originally owned Mary’s Bakery in Kensington so baking and candy making are certainly second nature to her. She has very fond memories of the chocolate, brown sugar, and divinity fudges that her mother made at Christmas and how they would appear in a plastic Christmas motif tri-sectioned dish on Christmas Eve. Homemade raisin bread toasted on Christmas morning is an annual tradition in the Burt household. Glenda doesn’t prepare a big Christmas Day breakfast because she says the whole day is spent eating; however, the raisin bread must be present to start the day off.

Other foods that will make their appearance over the holidays will be gingersnaps, dark fruitcake, meat pies (that Glenda says are pure comfort food) and, in deference to our Maritime culture, some kind of seafood which could be lobster in the shell or seafood chowder.

Chef Glenda is hosting her family Christmas on Boxing Day this year and she will be doing the cooking of the traditional Christmas dinner that will include roast turkey, stuffing, and veggies. Glenda will be serving her famous turnip casserole as well. This yummy dish is made with mashed turnip, a white sauce with Parmesan cheese, and topped with buttered bread crumbs.  Of course, all the traditional fixins’ like homemade rolls, pickles, and beets will be on the table to complement the turkey dinner.

 

My thanks to Premier Wade MacLauchlan, Leader of the PEI Green Party Peter Bevan-Baker, Mayor Bill Martin, Chef Irwin MacKinnon, and Chef Glenda Burt for sharing their Christmas food traditions with me.

Christmas at My Island Bistro Kitchen

Well, Christmas has come and gone again for another year.  I hope you had a joyous and peaceful holiday.  I thought I would share with you the traditional components of my Christmas dinner.  Guests were greeted with a glass of Sparkling Cranberry Apple Juice from Verger Belliveau Orchard in Memramcook, New Brunswick.

1-DSC01172

I like to set a pretty table.  This year, I used a gold-colored tablecloth, a couple of gold-colored glass Christmas trees and some gold and ivory Christmas balls and used them to start building the tablescape.  The gold theme seemed to blend in nicely with the tree and mantle in my dining room.

I kept the tablescape fairly simplistic and uncluttered since my dining room table is not large.  It can seat six but four, more comfortably.

I like to add a bit of bling to the tablesetting.  These blingy napkin rings were a find a couple of years ago.  Napkin rings are very useful when you want to keep the napkin fold simplistic or when you are in a hurry and don’t have time to fold napkins into designs.

My choice of centerpiece was seasonally-inspired.  The gold container and piks were in keeping with the gold theme and gold charger plates.

The Star of Bethlehem flower was the focal point of the centerpiece.

The holly berries came from one of my holly trees just outside my front door.

Since I couldn’t bring the snow indoors, bursts of Baby’s Breath gave the illusion of snow drops throughout the centerpiece.

Christmas Dinner was a four-course meal.  The appetizer was a red pear drizzled with a pomegranate molasses dressing.

I love the burst of flavor in each of the pomegranate arils.

Not only do the arils add flavor but they also add texture and color to the plate.

Some Islanders have roasted parsnips as a traditional vegetable on their Christmas dinner plate.  Parsnips were not a traditional vegetable for Christmas dinner in our home.  However, I have included parsnips in the Parsnip and Apple Soup.

Parsnip and Apple Soup
Parsnip and Apple Soup

A dollop of sour cream surrounded by a drizzle of good quality olive oil dresses up this flavourful soup.

The soup’s golden color continues the gold-colored theme.

I love this little soup tureen I came across a couple of years ago.

Of course, the star of the show is the roasted turkey!

There is nothing like an old-fashioned roast turkey dinner!  I dressed the turkey platter with a citrus theme of orange, lemon, and lime wedges along with green grapes and cranberries.

My choice of wine for this year’s Christmas dinner was Chardonnay that came from Matos Winery, St. Catherine’s, PEI.

We are very traditional in the components of the Christmas dinner – turkey, stuffing (dressing), mashed potatoes with homemade gravy (no gravy mix for me!), carrots, turnip casserole, and peas.  Condiments included my homemade cranberry sauce along with mustard pickles and pickled beets that I made earlier in the fall.

Plum pudding is the traditional Christmas dinner dessert in our household.

Traditional Plum Pudding
Traditional Plum Pudding

There are various toppings that are served with the steamed plum pudding; however, in our home, the brown sugar sauce (served hot) reigns supreme!

When presenting the plum pudding on a glass pedestal plate at the table, I kept the citrus theme going and added some fresh raspberries for color.

Plum pudding with a good cup of coffee – a fitting finale to a wonderful Christmas dinner!

I hope you have enjoyed a glimpse into our 2013 Christmas dinner.  Best wishes to you and yours for a wonderful holiday season.

To view other Christmas and New Year’s Tablesettings, click on the links below:

Glitz ‘n Glamour New Year’s Eve Tablesetting
Twas the Night Before Christmas
The Warmth of the Christmas Light Tablesetting
A Tartan Holiday Tablesetting
Pretty Poinsettia Tablesetting
Poinsettia Trio Tablesetting
The Holiday Table
The Pink and Green Holiday Table
Christmas Eve Tablesetting and Dinner
Purple Tablesetting for the Holidays
Evergreens and Reindeer Christmas Tablesetting

Cupcake Tablescape

Thank you for visiting “the Bistro” today.

Be sure to visit my Facebook page at My Island Bistro Kitchen.  You may also wish to follow me on twitter @PEIBistro, on Pinterest at “Island Bistro Kitchen”, and on Instagram at “PEIBistro”.

Plum Pudding – A Favorite Christmas Dinner Tradition on Prince Edward Island

I thought I knew what the most traditional Christmas food on Prince Edward Island would be.  However, for fun, I decided to use social media to ask Islanders what one food has to be on their tables over the holidays in order for it to be Christmas.  Sure, there were responses that mentioned fruitcake, Scotch cookies, seafood chowder, and meat pies and several other seasonal treats.  However, there was one food item that was repeatedly showing up and that is the traditional plum pudding.  Now, my informal survey is, by no means, scientific at all.  However, it gave a reasonably good indicator that was sufficient for me.  So, this posting is about plum pudding, the traditional Christmas dinner dessert in many Island households.

Plum Pudding
Plum Pudding

Plum Pudding Trivia and SymbolismThis recipe may be halved.

Plum pudding seems to have its origins in England and has been a popular food for centuries.  In preparation for this story, I did some research and discovered some interesting information about the Christmas pudding, or simply “pud”, as it is sometimes called.  How much of this is truth or superstition or folklore, I don’t know, but I found it interesting nonetheless.

The making of the pudding was apparently often made on what was referred to as “Stir-up Sunday” which would occur 4-5 weeks prior to Christmas, timed to coincide with Advent.  This allowed time for the flavors in the pudding to blend and mature in time for Christmas. One theory was to have 13 ingredients in the pudding to represent Christ and the 12 disciples. It was also customary for each member of the family to give a stir to the batter and make a wish while doing so on the premise that the wish would then come true.  Each person was to stir the batter from East to West to commemorate the three Wise Men who traveled in this direction to find the Christ child lying in a manger.  It seems that it was common to mix some tiny charms, coins, tokens, or favors into the pudding batter.  Each of those was said to have some significance to the person who discovered them in his or her piece of pudding.  For example, these might have included a ring (signifying marriage prospect), an anchor (safe harbour), mini horseshoe (luck), a coin (wealth), or a thimble (thriftness).

The pudding was often decorated with a sprig of holly, believed to symbolize the crown of thorns worn by Jesus when he was crucified.  The holly was also believed to have healing powers and would bring good luck. When the pudding was served to the table, it was often soused with liquor and set aflame and this was to signify the passion of Christ.  Who knew that plum pudding had all this symbolism!

Enduring Popularity

While many Islanders make their own plum puddings, there are several opportunities on PEI to buy them.  I checked around with some Island bakeries to see if they produced plum puddings and many do.

However, to find out just how popular the puddings are, year after year, with Islanders, I consulted with Pat Robinson of Charlottetown.  For several years, Pat produced plum puddings in her home kitchen for sale in aid of charity and support to non-profit organizations.  In 2012, Pat made over 500 puddings. From the pudding sale proceeds, Pat donated $4,000 to the Community Legal Information Association, $1,500 to the PEI Humane Society, and $250 to an Island family in need.

Pat believes that plum puddings have remained so popular because they are nostalgic.  They are typically only served at Christmas so that makes them a special once-a-year treat.  The aroma of the steamed pudding triggers warm memories of a traditional way of life and, for many, brings back fond memories of their childhood and of mothers, grandmothers, or aunts making the family plum pudding at Christmas.

Plum pudding has been the traditional Christmas dinner dessert in my family and, in my younger years, it was my grandmother’s role to make the pudding along with the brown sugar sauce to serve over the “pud”.

Ingredients

There are no plums in plum pudding!  Supposedly, several centuries ago, raisins (a primary ingredient in the pudding) were considered as plums.  Combinations of raisins may also be used – I use Lexia (big sticky raisins) and sultanas.  Currents are also a common ingredient and I do add them to my pudding.

Lexia (sticky) Raisins
Lexia (sticky) Raisins

While some cooks use only sultana raisins in their pudding, a variety of dried or candied/glazed fruits may also be added.  I use mixed peel (lemon, orange, and citron) in my pudding.

Mixed Peel
Mixed Peel

The raisins and fruit are bound together by eggs, flour, breadcrumbs, and suet (raw beef fat).  Suet is often available frozen.  However, my preference is fresh product and I am lucky enough to live near a great butcher shop at the Riverview Country Market so I was able to pick up some suet there.

Suet
Suet

A combination of sweet spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, ginger, and cloves are common in the pudding and give it its flavour. I also add mace and cardamom. Sugar and molasses are the typical sweeteners used.  How much molasses is used will also determine the color of the final product.  Some puddings are almost jet-black in color while others, like mine, are more of a medium brown color.  I also add a small amount of strawberry jam for both flavor and moistness.

My Island Bistro Kitchen's Plum Pudding
My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Plum Pudding

Not all plum puddings contain alcohol but it is a common ingredient with either spirits or stout being the most typical used.  Citrus juices may be used instead of alcohol, if desired.  The alcohol is believed to increase the shelf life of the pudding.  The featured Island product I use in my plum pudding is Strait Rum produced by Myriad View Artisan Distillery in Rollo Bay, PEI.

Strait Rum from Myriad View Artisan Distillery, Rollo Bay, PEI
Strait Rum from Myriad View Artisan Distillery, Rollo Bay, PEI

The batter for a plum pudding will be almost like a fruit cake consistency.

Mold

Special molds of decorative shapes are available for plum puddings.

Steamed Pudding Mold
Steamed Pudding Mold

You do not need a special mold, though.  A metal bowl or clean tin cans can be used. If you are not presenting the full pudding at the table, the tin cans are an ideal alternative as they make the pudding easy to slice.

Tin Cans Serve as Pudding Molds
Tin Cans Serve as Pudding Molds

However, if you are looking for presentation, a specialized mold will give an attractive shape.

Some still make the pudding in a cloth sack.  I know one cook who simply lays out a large square of a heavy cotton fabric on the counter, sprinkles the cloth with flour, then pours the batter onto the center of the cloth.  Leaving some head room for the pudding to expand, she gathers up the cloth and ties it tightly with string, then places it on a rack in a huge pot of boiling water.  Amazingly, the pudding batter does not leak out nor does water seep into the batter during the boiling process and make the pudding overly wet or soggy.

Steaming/Boiling

Plum pudding can be either steamed or boiled.  Both involve a hot water bath.  This keeps the pudding moist.

If using a mold, cover it with its cover or, if using a metal bowl or tin can, cover with a double layer of tin foil and secure it with string tied around the top of the container.

Place a wire rack on the bottom of a large pot.

Rack in pot
Rack in pot

Place the pudding mold on the wire rack and add boiling water to reach the level of about ½ to ⅔ the way up the side of the pudding mold or tin. Bring the water back to a full boil, then immediately reduce the heat to a gentle boil. It is important that the water boil gently during the cooking/steaming process, not be a rolling boil.  The pudding will generally take 3-4 hours to cook, depending on the size of mold you are using.  The pudding is done when a cake tester or skewer inserted into the center of the pudding comes out clean.  Plum puddings are meant to be very moist, not dry consistency.  Be sure to let the pudding cool to room temperature in the mold before removing it.

To boil the pudding in a bag, the process is similar.  A rack is placed on the bottom of a large pot of boiling water.  The pudding bag is set on the rack.  After the pudding is placed on the rack, the water is brought back to a rolling boil, then the temperature is immediately reduced to allow the water to boil gently.  The pudding is done when it is firm to the touch, usually after 2-3 hours, depending on the size of the pudding.  The bag is removed from the hot water bath, the pudding removed from the cloth sack, and transferred to an ovenproof pan.  The pudding can then be placed in a warm oven, set on a very low temperature, for about 5 minutes to dry off any excess moisture remaining on the pudding.

Storing

Wrap the cooled pudding tightly in plastic wrap and store in a sealed plastic bag.  The pudding will keep for about 3 weeks in the refrigerator or may be frozen for longer storage.

Re-heating

The pudding may be put back into its pudding mold and reheated for 1-2 hours in a hot water bath at the time of serving.  However, the easier way today is to simply microwave the pudding for just a few minutes until it is heated.  While you can heat the entire pudding in the microwave, it is quicker to cut the pudding into slices for reheating.

Serving

There are many different sauces/toppings served with plum pudding – brown sugar sauce, spiced cream, ice cream, or even a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream.  However, in our home, the tradition is to serve the pudding with a basic brown sugar sauce.

Plum Pudding Served with Buttered Rum Brown Sugar Sauce
Plum Pudding Served with Buttered Rum Brown Sugar Sauce

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To give the sauce a little “kick”, I sometimes add a dash of rum to deepen the flavor.  This, of course, is completely optional.  The liquor can be omitted; however, to maintain the same consistency, simply increase the amount of water equal to the amount of liquor called for in the recipe.

For many Islanders, they will finish off their Christmas dinner with plum pudding served with whatever topping is traditional in their household.

I am sharing my recipe for plum pudding with a brown sugar sauce, lightly flavored with rum distilled right here on PEI.

Is plum pudding one of your Christmas traditions?  Does it bring back memories for you?  What do you serve with the plum pudding?

(Printable version of recipe follows at end of posting)

My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Plum Pudding

Ingredients:

1 cup sticky raisins (Lexia)
1 cup sultana raisins
1 cup currants
⅔ cup mixed peel (lemon/orange/citron)
½ cup rum

1 cup flour
¾ tsp baking soda
¾ tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
⅛ tsp mace
⅛ tsp nutmeg
⅛ tsp allspice
¼ tsp ginger
⅛ tsp cardamom
dash cloves
1 cup fine breadcrumbs

1 cup suet
¾ cup brown sugar
2 eggs
⅓ cup molasses
¼ cup strawberry jam
½ cup milk

Method:

Assemble ingredients.

Plum Pudding Ingredients
Plum Pudding Ingredients

Grease or spray 8-cup (2-quart) pudding mold with cooking oil.

Pudding Mold
Pudding Mold

In bowl, combine raisins and mixed peel.  Add the rum.  Stir.  Set aside while preparing other ingredients.

In separate bowl, combine flour, soda, baking powder, and salt.

Add spices.

Add breadcrumbs.  Stir well to combine.

Stir the raisin and mixed peel mixture into the dry ingredients.

In another bowl, combine the suet, molasses, brown sugar, milk, jam, and eggs.  Mix well.

Pour the wet ingredient mixture into the flour and raisin mixture.  Stir to combine.

Spoon mixture into prepared mold, filling mold about ¾ full.  Cover.

In large stock pot, place a wire rack.  Place filled mold on rack.  Pour boiling water into stock pot, filling to about ½ to ⅔ the way up the side of the mold.  Bring water back to a boil and immediately reduce heat to a low boil over low heat to steam the pudding.  Cook for about 3 hours or until cake tester inserted into the center of the pudding comes out clean.  Make sure the water level stays at the ½ – ⅔ mark throughout the cooking process, adding more water as needed.

Remove pudding mold from the hot water bath and cool on a wire rack for a couple of hours.  Remove cover.

 

Invert pudding mold over a wire rack to remove pudding.

Wrap pudding in plastic wrap or in foil and place in a sealed bag.  The pudding will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks or it may be frozen for longer storage.

To reheat, either place the pudding back in its mold and heat in a hot water bath for 1-2 hours or, more simply, slice pudding and place slices on plate then microwave approximately 30-45 seconds per slice.  Serve with desired sauce.

Yield:  Apx. 12 servings

Buttered Rum Brown Sugar Sauce

 ¼ cup flour
1 cup brown sugar
¼ tsp salt
2 cup water
2 tsp vanilla
¼ cup rum (optional)
¼ cup melted butter

In large microwave-safe bowl, mix flour, sugar, and salt together.  Add remaining ingredients.  Stir to mix well.  Microwave on high for 3-4 minutes until thickened, stirring after each minute.  Serve hot over plum pudding.

Buttered Rum Brown Sugar Sauce
Buttered Rum Brown Sugar Sauce

Yield:  Apx. 10-12 servings

 

 

Happy Holidays!

Steamed Plum Pudding (Christmas Pudding)

A traditional classic Christmas pudding, the perfect finale to Christmas dinner. Serve warm with a rich brown sugar sauce for a decadent holiday dessert.

Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Servings 12
Author My Island Bistro Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sticky raisins (Lexia)
  • 1 cup sultana raisins
  • 1 cup currants
  • 2/3 cup mixed peel (lemon/orange/citron)
  • 1/2 cup rum
  • 1 cup flour
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 3/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp mace
  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp allspice
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1/8 tsp cardamom
  • dash cloves
  • 1 cup fine breadcrumbs
  • dash cloves
  • 1 cup suet
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/3 cup molasses
  • 1/4 cup strawberry jam
  • 1/2 cup milk

Buttered Rum Brown Sugar Sauce

  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 1/4 cup rum (optional)
  • 1/4 cup melted butter

Instructions

  1. Assemble ingredients.


    Grease or spray 8-cup (2-quart) pudding mold with cooking oil.


    In bowl, combine raisins and mixed peel. Add the rum. Stir. Set aside while preparing other ingredients.


    In separate bowl, combine flour, soda, baking powder, salt, and spices. Add breadcrumbs. Stir in the raisin and mixed peel mixture.


    In another bowl, combine the suet, brown sugar, eggs, molasses, jam, and milk. Mix well. Pour into flour and raisin mixture. Stir to combine. Pour mixture into prepared mold, filling mold about ¾ full. Cover.


    In large stock pot, place a wire rack. Place filled mold on rack. Pour boiling water into stock pot, filling to about ½ to ⅔ the way up the side of the mold. Bring water back to a boil and immediately reduce heat to a low boil over low heat to steam the pudding. Cook for about 3 hours or until cake tester inserted into the center of the pudding comes out clean. Make sure the water level stays at the ½ - ⅔ mark throughout the cooking process, adding more water as needed.


    Remove pudding mold from the water and cool on a wire rack for a couple of hours. Remove cover and invert pudding mold over a wire rack to remove pudding. Wrap pudding in plastic wrap or in foil and place in a sealed bag. The pudding will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks or it may be frozen for longer storage.


    To reheat, either place the pudding back in its mold and heat in a hot water bath for 1-2 hours or, more simply, slice pudding and place slices on plate then microwave approximately 30-45 seconds per slice. Serve with desired sauce.

Buttered Rum Brown Sugar Sauce

  1. In large microwave-safe bowl, mix flour, sugar, and salt together. Add remaining ingredients. Stir to mix well. Microwave on high for 3-4 minutes until thickened, stirring after each minute. Serve hot over plum pudding.

Recipe Notes

This recipe may be halved.

 

Christmas Plum Pudding
Christmas Plum Pudding

For other steamed pudding recipes from My Island Bistro Kitchen, click on the links below:

Steamed Carrot Pudding Recipe

Steamed Cranberry Pudding with Eggnog Sauce 

Thank you for visiting “the Bistro” today.

Be sure to visit my Facebook page at My Island Bistro KitchenYou may also wish to follow me on twitter @PEIBistro, on Pinterest at “Island Bistro Kitchen”, and on Instagram at “PEIBistro”.