Category Archives: Breads, Rolls, and Biscuits

Pumpkin and Eggnog Scones

Curate Stand with Scones for One along with Jam and Double Cream
Pumpkin and Eggnog Scones

Pumpkin and eggnog are two complementary flavors and they pair well in these Pumpkin and Eggnog Scones that are lovely in autumn and around the Christmas period. The scones are tasty served warm with clotted cream or English double cream, and fig jam, in particular, though any jam of choice can, of course, be used. They are also delicious served simply with a good slather of butter.

Note, from the photo below how I am taking a neutral stance on the Cornish method and the Devon method of applying the cream and jam to the scones! I enjoy scones via either method.

Plate with scone, English double cream, and jam
Pumpkin and Eggnog Scones served with English Double Cream and Fig Jam

Continue reading Pumpkin and Eggnog Scones

Buttery Buttermilk Biscuits Recipe

Basket of Homemade Biscuits
Buttermilk Biscuits

Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits, still slightly warm from the oven, are indeed a treat, especially when slathered with good butter. With their soft and tender texture and buttery flavor, these biscuits complement many meals. Continue reading Buttery Buttermilk Biscuits Recipe

Irish Soda Bread Recipe

Soda Bread
Irish Soda Bread

Chances are you have heard of Irish Soda Bread. Perhaps you have even made it yourself. Irish Soda Bread is a quick bread leavened with baking soda (bicarbonate of soda) that is activated by acidic buttermilk. Easy and quick to make because there is no yeast and no waiting for the dough to rise, this bread can be pulled together as easily as making tea biscuits or scones though the baking time will be longer. Continue reading Irish Soda Bread Recipe

Panettone Scones Recipe

Homemade Scones
Panettone Scones

Inspired by the famous Italian sweet fruit bread/cake, these Panettone Scones (or, perhaps, more aptly “Panescone”) are divine served with clotted cream or English double cream, and your favorite fruit jam or curd. They are particularly tasty served with any of my homemade jams or jellies and either my clementine curd or cranberry curd. Continue reading Panettone Scones Recipe

Billowy Soft Hot Cross Buns

Pan of Easter Rolls
Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are made with a yeasted enriched dough that is fragrant with warm spices. Usually, dried fruit is added. These buns are an Easter tradition in many homes. Traditionally eaten on Good Friday, and marking the end of Lent, Hot Cross Buns, with their signature cross on the top, carry the symbolism of the crucifixion of Jesus. Continue reading Billowy Soft Hot Cross Buns

Rustic Oatmeal Bread Recipe (aka Porridge Bread)

Loaf of Porridge Bread nestled inside a tea towel
Rustic Oatmeal Bread

Some may know this old-fashioned bread simply as “Porridge Bread” because of its rolled oat content. Rustic Oatmeal Bread is a hearty bread that has a soft, chewy texture. It’s ideal as a sandwich bread, makes fabulous toast, is great for French toast and, heck, it’s just fine slathered with butter or molasses! Continue reading Rustic Oatmeal Bread Recipe (aka Porridge Bread)

Rustic Oat Bran Biscuits

Biscuits
Rustic Oat Bran Biscuits

Having a repertoire of biscuit recipes at the ready is always handy. The wonderful thing about biscuits is that they are easy to make and can be pulled together quickly, just in time for a meal. This, of course, is due to the fact that they are leavened with baking powder, not yeast.

Biscuits are always best served when they are fresh from the oven and still slightly warm and that is true of these Rustic Oat Bran Biscuits, too. Continue reading Rustic Oat Bran Biscuits

How To Make Perfect Scones

Scones
Scones

There is just something absolutely delightful about fresh scones still warm from the oven.  Ever so much better they are when slathered with a dollop of either clotted cream or English double cream and a favorite jam or fruit curd such as lemon curd, for example. This posting today is all about how to make perfect scones. Continue reading How To Make Perfect Scones

Mouthwatering Homemade Dinner Rolls

Cloth-lined basket filled with huge puffy dinner rolls
Homemade Dinner Rolls

It’s hard to beat the tantalizing scent of homemade bread or dinner rolls baking in the oven.  It’s even harder to pass up the wonderful flavor of freshly made warm bread or rolls slathered with a generous spread of pure butter.  Do I have your attention yet? Continue reading Mouthwatering Homemade Dinner Rolls

Whole Wheat Biscuits Recipe

Whole Wheat Biscuits
Whole Wheat Biscuits

For me, one of the hallmarks of a wonderful homemade meal is a fresh batch of tender and flavorful whole wheat biscuits on the table! These are particularly good with baked beans (especially when the biscuits are slathered with molasses!) or, well, just about anything! Biscuits are a form of a quick bread so they don’t take long to whip up and, best of all, they only call for pantry staples like flour, baking powder, salt, butter, milk and sometimes a small amount of sugar.

Whole Wheat Biscuits
Whole Wheat Biscuits

My recipe calls for a combination of flours – 1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour and 3/4 cup whole wheat flour.  I find that using all whole wheat flour does not yield the tender texture that can be achieved by blending all-purpose flour with the whole wheat. Shortening or butter can be used as the fat for biscuits; however, nothing beats butter for flavor!

Whole Wheat Biscuits
Whole Wheat Biscuits

These biscuits have a different flavor and texture than my standard white biscuits and these are made with buttermilk (or sour milk) instead of with whipping cream and whole milk (click here for the recipe for my white tea biscuits). They are two distinctly different types of biscuits. The whole wheat ones are slightly more “rustic” while the white biscuits are very refined. I tend to make the whole wheat biscuits to serve alongside a more rustic meal like beans, chili, and stews, for example. My regular “go-to” standard biscuits are the white tea biscuits and, for sure, they are the ones I use for afternoon teas because of their light, tender crumb.

Whole Wheat Biscuit
Whole Wheat Biscuit

My hints for making biscuits are –

  • Use cold ingredients. In fact, it’s a good idea to put the flour mixture in the refrigerator for about an hour or so so that it is cold to start with.
  • Use cold butter or even frozen butter which is what I use. That cold butter will give  flaky tenderness to the biscuits.  The butter can be cut into the flour mixture with a pastry cutter but my preference is to hold a grater (with large holes) over the flour and grate the butter right into the flour. Stop and give the mixture a stir after grating some butter to integrate and distribute it and then keep on grating the rest of the butter. This helps to ensure that the butter gets incorporated right into the cold flour. If you grate the butter into a separate bowl, it will tend to clump together, especially as you transfer it to the flour mixture.
  • Only mix the liquid and dry ingredients as minimally as possible and do so gently and with a fork. Over-mixing will result in over-developing the flour’s gluten and yield tough biscuits. Just mix enough that the flour is incorporated and the batter starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.
  • Let the batter rest in the bowl for 1-2 minutes. This allows the ingredients to settle (they need to get to know each other!).
  • Turn the batter out on to a lightly floured surface. Knead the mixture 8-10 times only. Do NOT over-knead as  over-working the dough will “stir up” the gluten in the flours and will yield dense, tough biscuits. After kneading, little bits of the butter should still be visible in the dough. With biscuits, you are not “blending” ingredients but, rather, are simply barely mixing them just enough so that the dough sticks together.
  • Use a rolling pin, or simply pat the dough to about 1″ thickness.  Use desired size of biscuit cutter. A good, general size cutter for biscuits is a 2″ cutter. Flour the cutter before cutting each biscuit and cut the biscuits as close together as possible to minimize the amount of dough that will have to be gathered up and patted down again for the next cutting – remember, the goal is to minimize the amount of “working the dough” that happens . Make sure the cutter is sharp-edged and do not twist the cutter when cutting out the biscuits.  Cut straight down into the dough. Twisting the cutter while cutting the biscuits can be a cause of biscuits unevenly rising and hence spreading during the baking process – that’s when they lose their shape and go downhill to the point that they may look like a ski slope!
  • Once the first cut of biscuits is made from the dough, gather up the remaining bits and pat it down to 1″ thickness and continue to cut out remaining biscuits. Again, resist the urge to knead the dough any more than absolutely necessary to pull it together.
  • Bake the biscuits in a hot oven (450F) until they start to turn golden brown on top, about 14-16 minutes, generally.

Biscuits are best served slightly warm so make them just before the meal.

Whole Wheat Biscuits
Whole Wheat Biscuits

[Printable recipe follows at end of posting]

Whole Wheat Biscuits

Ingredients:
1¼ cups all-purpose flour
¾ cup whole wheat flour
4 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp granulated sugar
6 tbsp cold, unsalted butter, cut into small chunks
1 cup buttermilk or sour milk*

1-2 tbsp milk for brushing tops of biscuits

Method:
Preheat oven to 450°F.  Line baking sheet with parchment paper.

In large bowl, whisk together the flours, baking powder, salt, and sugar.

Grate cold (or frozen) butter over flour in bowl, or use a pastry cutter to cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

Make a well in the center of the ingredients. Pour milk into well in dry ingredients.  Using a fork, mix ingredients together just until flour mixture is incorporated.  Do not overmix. Mixture will be a soft, moist batter.

Let batter rest in bowl for 1-2 minutes then turn out onto a floured surface.  Knead dough 8-10 times.  Do not over-knead.

Roll or pat dough to desired thickness, about 1” thick.  Using a 2” floured round cookie cutter, cut out biscuits, re-flouring cutter before cutting out each biscuit.  Gather up remaining dough, pat down to about 1” thick and cut out biscuits.

Using a small spatula, transfer the biscuits to prepared baking sheet, placing them about 1” to 1½ “ apart. Prick tops of biscuits with fork tines and lightly brush with milk, if desired. Bake for 14-16 minutes or until lightly browned on top. Remove from oven and let cool on baking sheet for 3-4 minutes then transfer to wire rack.

Biscuits may also be placed close together in a greased baking pan with sides. Baking the biscuits in this manner will yield soft-sided biscuits.

*To sour milk, place 1 tbsp white vinegar in a measuring cup. Add enough milk to make 1 cup.  Stir. Let stand for 5 minutes to sour.

Yield:  Apx. 12-13 – 2” biscuits

Whole Wheat Biscuits
Whole Wheat Biscuits

Whole Wheat Biscuits Recipe

Yield: 12-13 - 2" biscuits

Delicious easy-to-make classic whole wheat biscuits that are tender and flavorful.

Ingredients

  • 1¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ cup whole wheat flour
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 6 tbsp cold, unsalted butter, cut into small chunks
  • 1 cup buttermilk or sour milk*
  • 1-2 tbsp milk for brushing tops of biscuits

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450°F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In large bowl, whisk together the flours, baking powder, salt, and sugar. Grate cold (or frozen) butter over flour in bowl, or use a pastry cutter to cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Make a well in the center of the ingredients.
  3. Pour milk into well in dry ingredients. Using a fork, mix ingredients together just until flour mixture is incorporated. Do not overmix. Mixture will be a soft, moist batter. Let batter rest in bowl for 1-2 minutes then turn out onto a floured surface. Knead dough 8-10 times. Do not over-knead.
  4. Roll or pat dough to desired thickness, about 1” thick. Using a 2” floured round cookie cutter, cut out biscuits, re-flouring cutter before cutting out each biscuit. Gather up remaining dough, pat down to about 1” thick and cut out biscuits.
  5. Using a small spatula, transfer the biscuits to prepared baking sheet, placing them about 1” to 1½ “ apart. Prick tops of biscuits with fork tines and lightly brush with milk, if desired. Bake for 14-16 minutes or until lightly browned on top. Remove from oven and let cool on baking sheet for 3-4 minutes then transfer to wire rack. Biscuits may also be placed close together in a greased baking pan with sides. Baking the biscuits in this manner will yield soft-sided biscuits.
  6. *To sour milk, place 1 tbsp white vinegar in a measuring cup. Add enough milk to make 1 cup. Stir. Let stand for 5 minutes to sour.
  7. Copyright My Island Bistro Kitchen
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by Yummly Rich Recipes
https://myislandbistrokitchen.com/2017/02/07/whole-wheat-biscuits-recipe/

If you have made this recipe and enjoyed it and/or wish to share it with your friends and family, please do so on social media but be sure to share the direct link to this posting from my website.

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You may also enjoy these other Biscuit recipes from My Island Bistro Kitchen:

Tea Biscuits
Buttery Buttermilk Biscuits
Rustic Oat Bran Biscuits

Pin This Whole Wheat Biscuit Recipe To Pinterest!
Whole Wheat Biscuits
Whole Wheat Biscuits

 

Whole Wheat Biscuits

 

Tea Biscuits Recipe

Do you love the smell of tea biscuits baking in the oven?  It’s one of my favorite kitchen scents.

My first recollection of biscuits dates back to visiting a grandmother.  She made the best biscuits, added a good slather of peanut butter to the warm, fresh-out-of-the-oven biscuits, and served them with a tall glass of cold milk to a wee gal patiently sitting on a high stool at her elbow by the cupboard.  I suspect her biscuit recipe was just made from memory and wasn’t written or recorded anywhere.  Isn’t it funny how some foods remind us of certain people and bring back great recollections!

Biscuits are not hard to make and they require only pantry staple ingredients — essentially, flour, leavening, salt, shortening/butter, and liquid – usually dairy (i.e., milk, whipping cream, or buttermilk).  What makes biscuit recipes differ is usually the quantity of ingredients used, the type of dairy used as liquid and, sometimes, there will be some additions to the basic ingredients – for example, some recipes call for cream of tartar, a small amount of sugar, or even an egg.

I often hear people say they can’t make biscuits because they always turn out hard as bricks.  I suspect this is quite likely due to over-kneading the dough.  Biscuit dough should be kneaded as little as possible, just enough to gather up the dough and have it hold together to cut out the biscuits.  Usually, only 8-10 kneads is all that is required. I have published lots of tips and hints for making biscuits in a post containing my Buttermilk Biscuit recipe which you can access by  clicking here. If you are new to biscuit making or have experienced issues with making satisfactory biscuits in the past, you may find some of the hints and tips in that post useful.

Texture of biscuit
Texture of biscuit

The dough can be rolled out with a rolling pin or simply patted to the desired thickness, which is what I do.  I find about 1″ thick dough yields a good depth of biscuit.  I use a 2″ crinkled-edge cookie cutter for mine but a straight edge cutter works just as well.

Over the years, I have tried many biscuit recipes, some yielding good results, others not so much.  As the old saying goes, if you can’t find something already suitable, develop your own so that’s what I have done to create my own biscuit recipe that has come from many kitchen testing trials to arrive at the right selection and amount of ingredients to yield the flavour and texture I was looking for.

[Printable recipe follows at end of post]

My Island Bistro Kitchen’s Tea Biscuits

Ingredients:

2¼ cups all-purpose flour
1 tbsp sugar
4 tsp baking powder
¾ tsp salt
½ tsp cream of tartar
¼ cup cold unsalted butter
⅔ cup whipping cream
¾ cup whole milk

1-2 tbsp milk for brushing on top of biscuits

Method:

Assemble ingredients.

Preheat oven to 425°F. Line large baking sheet with parchment paper.

In large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and cream of tartar.

Using a pastry cutter, cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Make a well in the center of the ingredients.

In large measuring cup, mix together the whipping cream and milk. Pour into well in dry ingredients. Mix together just until flour mixture is incorporated. Do not overmix. Mixture will be a soft, moist batter.

Let batter stand in bowl for just a minute or so then turn out onto a floured surface. Knead dough 8-10 times, just until it holds together enough to cut out the biscuits. Do not over-knead.

Roll or pat to desired thickness – I suggest about 1” thick will yield a good depth of finished biscuit.

Using a 2” round floured cookie cutter, cut out biscuits.  Dip the cookie cutter in flour before cutting out each biscuit.

Gather up remaining dough, pat down to about 1” thick, and cut out the rest of the biscuits.

Using a small spatula, transfer the biscuits to prepared baking sheet, placing them about 2” apart. If desired, prick tops of biscuits with fork tines and lightly brush with milk.

Bake for 14-16 minutes or until lightly browned on top.

Yield: Apx. 16 – 2” biscuits.

Tea Biscuits

Ingredients

  • 2¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • ¾ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp cream of tartar
  • ¼ cup cold unsalted butter
  • 2/3 cup whipping cream
  • ¾ cup whole milk
  • 1-2 tbsp milk for brushing on top of biscuits

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and cream of tartar.
  3. Using a pastry cutter, cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
  4. Make a well in the center of the ingredients.
  5. In large measuring cup, mix together the whipping cream and milk. Pour into well in dry ingredients. Mix together just until flour mixture is incorporated. Do not overmix. Mixture will be a soft, moist batter.
  6. Let batter stand in bowl for just a minute or so, then turn out onto a floured surface.
  7. Knead dough 8-10 times. Do not over-knead.
  8. Roll or pat to desired thickness, about 1” thick.
  9. Using a floured 2” round cookie cutter, cut out biscuits. Dip cutter in flour before cutting out each biscuit.
  10. Gather up remaining dough, pat down to about 1” thick, and cut out biscuits.
  11. Using a small spatula, transfer the biscuits to prepared baking sheet, placing them about 2” apart. If desired, prick tops of biscuits with fork tines and lightly brush with milk.
  12. Bake for 14-16 minutes or until lightly browned on top.
  13. Yield: Apx. 16 - 2" biscuits
  14. Copyright My Island Bistro Kitchen
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by Yummly Rich Recipes
https://myislandbistrokitchen.com/2015/05/17/tea-biscuits/

You may also enjoy these other biscuit recipes from My Island Bistro Kitchen:

Buttery Buttermilk Biscuits
Rustic Oat Bran Biscuits
Whole Wheat Biscuits

If you have made this recipe and enjoyed it and/or wish to share it with your friends and family, please do so on social media but be sure to share the direct link to this posting from my website.

Connect with My Island Bistro Kitchen on Social Media

Join the Facebook page for My Island Bistro Kitchen:  https://www.facebook.com/MyIslandBistroKitchen/

Follow “the Bistro” on “X” (formerly Twitter)https://twitter.com/PEIBistro/

See the drool-worthy gallery of mouth-watering food photos from My Island Bistro Kitchen on Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/peibistro/

Follow “the Bistro” on Pinterest at https://www.pinterest.ca/peibistro/ and pin the Pinterest-ready photo at the end of this posting to your favorite Pinterest boards!

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Biscuits
Tea Biscuits

Posting was last updated October 13, 2023

Homemade White Bread

I love making bread from scratch.  I like working and kneading the dough, the smell of the dough as it rises, and especially as it bakes.  No commercial potpourri could ever duplicate the wonderful scent of homemade bread baking in the oven!  It just permeates the whole house and whets the appetite.  We do have an electric bread machine in the family but it’s not the same.  I find bread made in the machine is not too bad on the day it is made but, after that, I don’t care for it so much, finding it to be somewhat tough.  My preference is to make bread the old-fashioned, traditional way. Today, I am sharing my recipe and technique for making homemade white bread.


I first made bread when I was about 15.  Under the supervision of my grandmother, I produced my first batch of bread on a cold Saturday in winter.  To say that Gram was somewhat proud that day would be a huge understatement!  I grew up with homemade bread regularly being made by both my grandmother and mother so it comes rather naturally to me to make yeast breads and rolls.  They are not hard to make but there is a technique to them and they are somewhat time-consuming as the process is ongoing for a good part of a day.  Nevertheless the end result is so worth the time and effort.

Along with my recipe for white bread, I do have some tips to help achieve success in bread making.  First, the temperature of the liquids for the bread is super important.  For example, the temperature of the water for the yeast to raise should be lukewarm, generally around the 100°F – 110°F point.  Any cooler, and the yeast may not rise; any hotter, and the yeast will be killed off.  Unless you are a very experienced bread maker who, from years of experience and by instinct, can judge the liquid temperature for yeast, I recommend using a candy/food thermometer to get the temperature of the water just right.  A small amount of sugar has to be added to the warm water in order to “feed” the yeast and encourage it to grow.

Some say, with today’s pasteurized milk, there is no need to scald the milk anymore.  I do still scald it because I think it provides a nice warm environment in which to place the risen yeast and it is not such a shock for the warm yeast as if it was to be mixed with cold milk.  Again, I recommend using a candy thermometer when scalding the milk to get it to the right temperature.  As well, it is important to let the scalded milk mixture cool down to about 100°F as well; otherwise, if it is too hot when the yeast is poured into it, it may kill off the yeast and the bread won’t rise properly.

You’ll find that, with my recipe, I use my Kitchen Aid mixer fitted with the dough hook to help get the dough started and to incorporate some of the flour into the dough.  I find this makes for a nice textured bread (not to mention, it takes less muscle).  Once enough flour has been added that the dough starts to leave the sides of the bowl as the dough hook moves around the bowl, remove the bowl from the mixer and turn the dough out onto a floured surface and start working in the remaining flour.  Only add as much flour to the dough as is necessary to create a smooth and elastic dough. Be patient when kneading the dough – it will take, on average, between 8 and 10 minutes.

As for the shape of the loaves, there are a couple of options.  One is make two equally-sized balls and place them in the pan.  This will generate the shape in the top photo below.  The other is to shape the dough into an oval shape.  This will achieve a shape like the loaf in the bottom photo below and it is commonly referred to as the sandwich loaf because, mostly, the slices will all be about the same height.  This is in contrast to the two-part loaf where slices in the middle of the loaf where the two pieces are joined will be shorter.  So, the shape of the loaf is a matter of preference and is largely determined by what you are going to use the bread for.

Some bakers place the dough in the oven with the door shut and oven light on to help it rise.  My preference, however, is to create a nice, cozy little spot for the bread to rise.  I start with a heating pad turned on the lowest setting.  I place a lightweight blanket on top of the heating pad and then place the bowl with the dough in it on top of that.  I fold the blanket over and around the bowl to create a snuggly warm, draught-free spot for the bread to rise.  My heating pad’s lowest setting is barely warm but it does provide a consistent temperature for the bread to rise.  Don’t use higher settings on the heating pad as it may cause the bread to start to ‘cook’ and could interfere with the natural rising process.

My Island Bistro Kitchen’s White Bread

Ingredients:

2 cups scalded milk
3 tbsp butter or shortening, room temperature
½ tbsp salt
3 tbsp sugar

½ cup warm water
1 tsp sugar
1 tbsp dry yeast

4½ – 5 cups all-purpose flour

Method:

In medium-sized saucepan, scald milk.  Remove from heat.  Add butter, sugar, and salt.  Stir until butter is melted. Let cool to 100°F.

Heat ½ cup water to 100°F to 110°F point.  Stir in 1 tsp sugar.  Sprinkle yeast granules over the water and quickly stir them gently into the water.  Let stand, undisturbed, for about 10 minutes.  Stir down the yeast mixture.  Transfer to large bowl of stand mixer fitted with dough hook.

Add cooled milk mixture to yeast in bowl.  Beat on low to incorporate ingredients then increase mixer speed to high and beat until mixture is smooth.  Slowly add in flour, one cup at a time.  Add flour until the mixture begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl.

Turn dough on to floured surface and mix in enough remaining flour to make a smooth, elastic dough.  Knead 8-10 minutes until dough becomes smooth and very pliable and elastic.

Transfer dough to a large greased bowl.  Place a small amount of oil on hands and lightly grease the top and sides of the dough. Cover bowl with plastic wrap.

Place bowl in warm area, covered with a towel or light blanket.  Let rise until double in bulk, about 1½ hours or so.

Punch down dough.

Divide dough into two equal portions and shape into loaves.  Place in greased 9”x5” loaf pans.  Cover with tea towel and place in warm area to rise again for between 45 and 60 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Bake bread for 30-35 minutes until nicely browned on top and loaves sound hollow when tapped.  Immediately transfer bread from pans to wire racks to cool.  Grease tops of hot bread with butter, if desired.

Yield:  2 loaves

Homemade Bread with Strawberry Jam
Homemade Bread with Strawberry Jam

 

White Bread

This classic homemade white bread with its tender crumb and soft texture is the perfect bread for sandwiches and toast. Ingredients:
Course Bread
Cuisine Canadian
Keyword bread, white bread
My Island Bistro Kitchen My Island Bistro Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 2 cups scalded milk
  • 3 tbsp butter or shortening, room temperature
  • ½ tbsp salt
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • ½ cup warm water
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp dry yeast
  • 4½ - 5 cups all-purpose flour

Instructions

  1. In medium-sized saucepan, scald milk. Remove from heat. Add butter, sugar, and salt. Stir until butter is melted. Let cool to 100°F.
  2. While the milk is cooling, heat ½ cup water to 100°F to 110°F point. Stir in 1 tsp sugar. Sprinkle yeast granules over the water and quickly stir them gently into the water. Let stand, undisturbed, for about 10 minutes, until yeast rises and becomes frothy. Stir down the yeast mixture and add it to the lukewarm milk mixture. Transfer mixture to the large bowl of stand mixer fitted with dough hook attachment. Beat on low to incorporate ingredients then increase mixer speed to high and beat until mixture is smooth.

  3. Slowly add in flour, one cup at a time. Add flour until the mixture begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl. Turn dough on to floured surface and mix in enough remaining flour to make a smooth, elastic dough. Knead 8-10 minutes until dough becomes smooth and very pliable and elastic.
  4. Transfer dough to a large greased bowl. Place a small amount of oil on hands, lightly grease the top and sides of the dough. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and place bowl in warm area, covered with a towel or light blanket. Let rise until double in bulk, about 1½ hours or so.
  5. Punch down dough. Divide into two equal portions and shape into loaves. Place in two greased 9”x5” loaf pans. Cover with tea towel and place in warm area to rise again for between 45 and 60 minutes.
  6. Preheat oven to 350°F. Bake bread for 35-40 minutes until nicely browned on top and loaves sound hollow when tapped. Immediately transfer bread from pans to wire racks to cool. Grease tops of hot bread with butter, if desired.

Recipe Notes

Yield: 2 loaves 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright My Island Bistro Kitchen 2014

You may also enjoy these other homemade bread recipes from My Island Bistro Kitchen:

Old-fashioned Raisin Bread
Rustic Oatmeal Bread (aka Porridge Bread)
Whole Wheat Bread 

If you have made this recipe and enjoyed it and/or wish to share it with your friends and family, please do so on social media but be sure to share the direct link to this posting from my website.

Connect with My Island Bistro Kitchen on Social Media

Join the Facebook page for My Island Bistro Kitchen:  https://www.facebook.com/MyIslandBistroKitchen/

Follow “the Bistro” on “X” (formerly Twitter)https://twitter.com/PEIBistro/

See the drool-worthy gallery of mouth-watering food photos from My Island Bistro Kitchen on Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/peibistro/

Follow “the Bistro” on Pinterest at https://www.pinterest.ca/peibistro/ and pin the Pinterest-ready photo found at the end of this post to your favorite Pinterest boards.

Pin Me To Pinterest!
Bread
Homemade White Bread